Thursday, March 26, 2015

DPW Spotlight Interview: Saundra Lane Galloway

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Saundra's painting, "S'up" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Saundra's DPW Gallery Page:

An artist for over 35 years working in oil, acrylic, watercolor, wax and most recently mixed media. You will see paintings in several different media. Saundra graduated with a degree in Art Education and taught public school secondary level for over 10 years. She now works in her home studio and teaches workshops in mixed media, wax collage and other requested art topics.

Saundra has won awards in Nebraska and Colorado and shows regularly throughout Colorado. (click to view more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I actually began painting in 1975 when I was in college.  For many years, I read books and I really taught myself.  The desire to paint and be an artist began before I can remember.  I always wanted to be an artist.  I used to draw “Bambi” in magazine articles that were advertisements for art schools.  They sent me letters back that said I should pick another career.  However, that never killed my desire, so I just practiced and read and observed the world around me and did my own thing.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

Yes, I stopped when my children were born so I could do the mom thing, and then, when they were older, I painted and drew when I got off work.  When I began teaching full time in the early 90’s, I did not have time to do my own art during the school year, but picked it back up in the summers.  Eventually, I figured out that I could create lesson plans that incorporated what I wanted to do - teach and create a painting or piece of artwork for an example… I didn’t get to work constantly on my own interests, but it did allow me to keep my fingers in my work.  My students were very enthusiastic learners, and even began selling the work they did in class.  It was very rewarding to see!

S'up
(click to see original image)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Saundra's interview.
What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I have worked in oil, watercolor, acrylic, wax, charcoal, fiber, paper, wire, metal, wood; well just about everything I can think of.  I absolutely love experimenting!

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

I have developed a way of working that has allowed me to hold on to just about all the media I’ve experimented with.  I don’t do a lot of wax collage, but I still love it.  I don’t work in straight watercolor anymore, but I do manipulate acrylics as if they were watercolor when my work needs it.  
Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I want to work more in 3-D.  I love working with materials I have created and am constantly trying to find ways to combine them.  Lately, I’ve been interested in how I can use my paper casts that I created molds for in old window frames; combined with branches.  My mind just will not stop trying to find ways to do things in a visual sense.

Who or what inspires you most?

My inspiration comes from observation and experimentation.  I have been an avid “watcher of the world” ever since I can remember.  It can be a color, or the way a composition comes from seeing a shoelace in the sun… just about anything.  I am inspired by Alisa Burke; our work isn’t the same, but her desire to find new ways to explain existing things and her recycling very much inspires me.  Other strong women like her have always been an inspiration.
What does procrastination look like for you?

I have never been one to procrastinate, so I’m not sure how to think about this.  I was always that kid that did what I was asked first, before I played, and that has followed me all my life.  I suppose it is a bit boring, but I am just wired that way.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

If I am excited about what I am doing there is nothing that will keep me from working on my art every moment I can.  I think of my art as my job; my fun job mind you, but still my job, my responsibility, so I apply responsible thought to my work.  I have a routine where I get up and begin… before I shower, before anything just about. It doesn’t matter if I do it for five minutes or an hour, I just start. After that, inspiration takes over and there is no stopping me.
How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

As I have mentioned, I am an observer of everything: color, pattern, design in everything. One idea came to me from the design on the back of my bathroom door while I was showering.  I have ideas for two paintings that I see in the tiles in my shower.  I take time to look at lots of art.  I want to find inspiration in them.  I see the colors they use and that gives me ideas, I see a line that looks so nice and it can become a beginning of a new piece.  I am just always thinking and experimenting with so many things and ideas just come from that.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

If I am bored with what I am doing it is a clear indication that I need to grow. If I feel burned out, I take time to get away.  I use that time to see the world, walk a path near a lake, anything to clear my head.  It usually doesn’t take very long.  My fingers itch when I go too long without working.
Again, experimenting with many different materials is the absolute best way to continue to grow and keep work fresh.  I don’t feel like I have to continue doing the same thing because it is expected of me by a gallery owner or a collector.  I believe it is my responsibility to myself to continue to grow and change and find exciting ways to express my vision as an artist and person.

I have found that if I am excited with my work others will feel it as well.  There is no wall to stop a person if they are willing to find a creative way through it or around it or over it!  I apply this belief system in my life.  I don’t like the word “can’t”.  It is stifling and well, just not true in my world! Ha... within reason.  I’m pretty sure I can’t spontaneously speak another language, but I can learn how.
What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

To continue to work diligently at something I love and becoming a success.  Success to me is a fulfillment of my dreams. I will find joy and excitement in my work, and I will share it.  I am learning that there are no walls, that there is always a new thing just around the corner that I will want to try and share.

What makes you happiest about your art?

That I get to do it!  I am so thrilled that my mind just keeps coming up with ideas and thoughts that lead to new work.  I have ideas that, in order to follow them all will take years… That is thrilling and fun!

Thanks, Saundra!

© 2015 Sophie Catalina Marine

Thursday, March 19, 2015

DPW Spotlight Interview: Dorothy Fagan

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. 

To enter to win Dorothy's painting, "Cliffside Dwelling, France" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Dorothy's DPW gallery page:


I paint in oil and mixed media. I work en plein air and in my studio near the Chesapeake Bay in Virginia. In 2013, I was fortunate to have a six week residency in France, painting en plein air in Provence, Brittany, Normandy, along the Emerald Coast, Giverny and Paris. I became fascinated with the juxtapositon of ancient structures, vibrant people and the landscape.
You can find info on Dorothy's current art show (happening March 20-22) here - http://paradisecityarts.com/


Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.



I have been painting since I was a little girl. My bedroom was always an art studio. I won my first award at fourteen, a five-county regional in New Jersey.


Cliffside Dwelling, France
(click to see original image)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Dorothy's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

As a young mother, I suffered a series of traumas. The PTSD and depression caused me much difficulty. Ultimately, my art became the healing force which enabled me to move past them. This helped me learn the connection between energy medicine and painting. As a result of this, I lead classes in healing color for people from all walks of life.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I have a BFA in Printmaking and Painting. After college, I worked in pastel exclusively for twenty-five years. I also work in oil. During my residency at Musee de la Grande Vigne in Brittany, I experimented with turpentine wash fused with willow charcoal. Returning to the States, this led me to my mixed media fusion paintings, using alkyd paint with willow charcoal and pastel.

Island
(click to see original image)

Who or what inspires you most?

Landscape has always been my inspiration. However, since my French residency in 2013, I find much inspiration in my interactions with people. My blog has become a Virtual Artists' Residency where I am exchanging creative ideas with readers. I have begun teaching again and find it very stimulating.

What does procrastination look like for you?

I don't procrastinate. I have some projects which are in the incubation period. Others which are in action. I don't confuse the two.

Blonde Wax Beans
(click to see original image)

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I am painting all the time. Even if I don't have a brush in my hand, I am painting in my mind's eye. Generally, I write in the mornings and paint in the afternoons. I take a day off to have lunch with a girlfriend.

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I am still working on ideas from my French residency. One painting usually begets others. I follow them and they lead me through self exploration. Writing about them on my blog opens new ideas as well.

High Tide, St Jaces de la Mer
(click to see original image)

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

Some time ago, I came to the realization that even if my painting is inspired by something I have seen in the landscape - what I am really painting is a self portrait - an inner landscape. This realization made me a better painter and keeps me engaged in exploring new territory every day. I am always eager to go into the studio to see what I painted yesterday - it always surprises me!

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

This year, I am planning a residency in Tuscany. From August through October, I will paint and blog from Tuscany. My project is called, "Muses of Tuscany," as three 'muses' will visit me to inspire my paintings. When I return home in November, I will exhibit the paintings at the Paradise City Arts Festival in Marlborough, MA. People can register to follow this project on my blog.

Lavande Magic
(click to see original image)

What makes you happiest about your art?

I am happiest when I connect with someone through my paintings. Watching someone see themselves in a painting is a humbling experience. I am so fortunate to be able to paint and share my art. I can't think of anything I'd rather do. I even paint with my grandchildren!

Thanks, Dorothy!

© 2015 Sophie Catalina Marine

Thursday, March 12, 2015

DPW Spotlight Interview: Diane Eugster

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. 

To enter to win Diane's painting, "Reflection" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Diane's DPW gallery page:

Since my mother was also an artist, painting has always been a big part of my life. As a child I loved drawing people, as an adult I hiked the red canyons of Nevada capturing the rugged landscape, but figurative painting has always been my passion. Teaching classes and workshops over the years has definitely helped to hone my painting skills. I've been involved in and won awards in Oil Painters of America and American Impressionist Society exhibits as well as being represented by several galleries; The Weatherburn Gallery, Naples Florida, The Lee Youngman Gallery, Calistoga California, The Willow Gallery, Scottsdale,Arizona and the Gallery at Summerlin, Las Vegas. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

My mother was an artist. I don't know how she found the time to paint with two small children, but I do remember the smell of linseed oil on rags as she toned her canvases. When I was a teenager my father bought The Artist, an art supply store, which was also my first job. Reading all the art books when business was slow and getting substantial art supply discounts enabled me to creatively experiment with many materials. This experience provided the spring board to really dive into painting.

Reflection
(click to see original image)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Diane's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

Oh yes, in around 2008, I was questioning my motives for painting. The excitement in the beginning had been replaced with meeting deadlines for shows, the experimenting replaced with "just getting it done". So one day, I boxed up my brushes and paints, not being sure if I would ever open them up again.

Three years later, I realized the original things that drew me to painting were still there, I just had to go back to a place before I let other things get out of control. Someone told me to just paint what I love and other people will share in my enthusiasm, that has been very good advice.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I worked for several years in watercolor. I was even the librarian on the board of our Las Vegas Watercolor Society. Again, devouring the books and videos, taking yearly workshops offered, and featuring artists such as Stephen Quiller and Don Andrews caused my skill level to rise exponentially. Eventually, I changed to oils when I realized what a flexible medium it was.

First Tide
(click to see original image)

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away? 

Oil paint really allows me to "speak paint". The things I want to express about my subjects just seem to flow from paint to canvas. It feels very natural to me. I don't see myself changing mediums anytime soon.

Who or what inspires you most?

When I began oil painting, it was primarily as a plein air landscape artist. Hiking in the Red Rock Canyon to find subjects to paint was my favorite past time. I loved the feeling of being outdoors, even in adverse conditions while I painted. In 2001, I started going to weekly life drawing sessions. This is where my eyes were opened to the endless possibilities of using not only the human body but also individual expressions to make painterly stories.

On a day to day basis, I've found many artists on the internet that give me inspiration. One of my favorite places to find inspiration is Pinterest. My top three list would include John Singer Sargent, Joaquin Sorrolla and John Asaro.

Mending Her Shoe
(click to see original image)

What does procrastination look like for you?

I find procrastination creeps in when I make a drawing for a new painting in the morning. I'll look at it over and over but there it is, untouched for the rest of the day. I tell myself I'll begin on it tomorrow but other "more important" things come up that I just have to do. After a day or so of that, I realize I didn't have a firm idea of what I wanted to do with that painting in the first place. The remedy then is to move on and choose another subject. Not every image is a good reason for a painting.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Since doing the 30 paintings in 30 days challenge, I've realized I need to be working in longer blocks of consecutive time so that my paint stays workable during the whole process. I've documented many of the things I learned during this challenge on my blog at DianesPaintingBlog.Wordpress.com. Now, I plan my painting to fall on three consecutive days. Day 1 - get the drawing down correctly, day 2 - work for five to seven hours on the painting, day 3 - as long as it takes to finish. This gives me the rest of the week to get other things done.

Looking West
(click to see original image)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I orchestrate photo shoots using scenes and clothing that fit the personality of the individual I'm working with. The resulting photos fill my thoughts with so many scenarios and stories I just can't wait to get them out of my head and onto the canvas.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I don't plan my paintings as much as I used to. Jumping into it a little unsure of what's going to happen keeps my senses sharp. I also learned doing the 30/30 to just hang in there, every painting has it's rough spots, and it's all a part of the process. I believe in the past I've given up on too many paintings too soon.

White Veil
(click to see original image)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I'm learning more and more about the importance of harmony in my painting. Using fewer colors and slowing down to see how everything is interconnected has improved my work immensely.

What makes you happiest about your art?

When I get to that place in a painting I mentioned above, the rough spot, then I begin to slowly pull it out of discord and into the place I had imagined in my head. It's such a fantastic feeling, like playing an instrument and making beautiful music.

Thanks, Diane!

© 2015 Sophie Catalina Marine

Thursday, March 5, 2015

DPW Spotlight Interview: Jim Bliss

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. 

To enter to win Jim's painting, "Miss Cow" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Jim's DPW gallery page:

Jim Bliss was formerly a professional illustrator for 30 years, working with clients including Disney, The Wall Street Journal, The National Geographic Society, and hundreds of others. Currently, he is on disability and supplements his income, as much as possible, by selling his art. He often collaborates with his wife, Noma Bliss on paintings, as is the case with numerous works offered for sale here on Daily Paintworks.

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

My dad worked as a graphic designer and illustrator for his entire professional life. He encouraged my brothers and I to create art from the time we first began to mumble sounds. Throughout much of my childhood, my dad taught us techniques and introduced us to a variety of mediums and was always encouraging. I learned a lot from watching my dad and competing with my brothers.

Miss Cow
(click to see original image)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Jim's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

High School was a dry period for me as I was thoroughly confused over just about everything. Later, (after attending Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NY for a year as a 'special student') upon returning home when the school year ended, I shocked my dad by telling him that I was no longer interested in art, and wanted to go into construction. Apparently, some of that confusion was still lingering. After that, I got sensible and began my career as an illustrator, which lasted about thirty years.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

There is very little that I have not tried. As an illustrator, I did digital work and airbrush as well as created with many painting techniques using every medium imaginable. I've also done ceramic work.

My Dog
(click to see original image)

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Most of my work now is executed with a combination of painting techniques using oil, acrylic and pencil. I lost interest in digital work and airbrush as I find them both tedious and lacking in 'feeling'. I'd rather have fun.

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

Any exploration that I do generally comes about spontaneously, as I may discover a new, better way of applying paint or using my brushes to speed up the process or create interesting effects. I also do a lot of experimenting with the way I design faces or figures, whether human or animal.

Dapper Frog
(click to see original image)

Who or what inspires you most?

Most of my inspiration and ideas come from my own brain. I've looked at art my whole life so I'm sure that I have influences though none I can point to specifically. As I work very closely with my artist wife Noma Bliss, I learn much from watching her and have over time learned to loosen up due to her fearless influence. Also, always a source of inspiration is my passionate interest in animal life and the natural world. Most of my work includes animals.

What does procrastination look like for you?

I rarely procrastinate when it come to doing art. If I don't feel like doing something, I'll do it even quicker than if I'm enthused just to get it out of the way.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Art has always been the way I have earned my living so the fact is that art is just about all I do. Even through the middle of the sleepless night.

Cat Woman
(click to see original image)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

Often, my wife gives me ideas, other times, I use my own brain. My ideas are generally so simple that they do not require much mental exertion.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

Once again, very often my wife Noma searches around for innovative approaches or techniques and gives them to me. She seems to enjoy doing it, and generally has great suggestions, so I don't mind. Saves me the trouble. As for the imagery that I select, I use my own sensibility to determine an approach. My goal is creating a piece that is always geared toward sell-ability, so I always try to create a visually interesting and pleasing-to-the-eye finished product.

Sir Pug
(click to see original image)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I think the thing that pleases me the most about my art at present is that at sixty-one years of age, I am continuing to improve at my drawing and painting skills. I draw and paint much faster than I have in the past and with superior results. My wife's influence has been key, as she is a very intuitive painter and obeys no stultifying rules.

What makes you happiest about your art?

I'm happy because I probably have one of the best jobs that anyone can have. How many people get paid money for simply expressing their joy?

Thanks, Jim!

© 2015 Sophie Catalina Marine

Thursday, February 26, 2015

DPW Spotlight Interview: Chris Breier

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. 

To enter to win Chris's painting, "The Village" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Chris's DPW gallery page:

From Buffalo New York. I work in acrylics in a variety of genres, both abstract and representational. (click to view bio)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I've always been interested in art so there wasn't a specific moment when I decided that I was going to become a painter. I spent a lot of time drawing as a child and I never lost interest in it.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

There was a period after college when I was trying to figure out what I could do to make a living and that didn't leave a lot of time for painting. I was learning about computers, graphic design, and the printing industry.

The Village
(click to see original image)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Chris's interview.


What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I've experimented with numerous mediums: oil, acrylic, watercolor, charcoal, pen and ink, and encaustic. The genres that I've worked in are abstraction, landscape, cityscape, figure drawing, and still life.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Acrylics are probably my favorite medium. They have their own unique look but they can also mimic many of the more traditional mediums such as oils or watercolors. The quick drying time of acrylics allow me to rapidly build up layers of color, and to easily paint over mistakes.

I worked with oils in college but I've found that I'm sensitive to the solvents; they give me a headache and I didn't like the idea of storing flammable liquids in my home. I also don't have the patience for long drying time.

Japanese Gardens
(click to see original image)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I'm looking forward to working abstractly again. I think it would be fun to apply what I've learned from working representationally to abstract painting.

I recently became serious about watercolor and I found that it's the most demanding painting medium that I've tried; there's very little room for error due to the transparent nature of the paint. If you overwork it there's no way to fix it.

I would also like to explore painting outdoors more. I think working outside would be a good way to stay motivated, especially during the summer months.

Who or what inspires you most?

Looking at great art inspires me, there are so many paintings in museums and online that are phenomenal - I look at them and try to figure out how they did it. I love learning about how other artists paint so I have a lot of art videos, magazines, and books.

Grain Elevators
(click to see original image)

What does procrastination look like for you?

The internet is a great way to kill time. Watching TV is a close second. I wouldn't try to eliminate these things from my life though because new ideas often come to me during these idle moments. The key is to make time for both work and relaxation every day.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I wake up early in the morning and paint before leaving for work so that it's the first thing that I do, otherwise I would probably never get around to it. My goal is to paint every day for an hour. If I paint for longer than that I usually take a break so that I can stay sharp.

I try to eliminate the busywork as much as possible. For example, I haven't stretched a canvas or primed my own wood panels in years. The cost of prepared panels isn't that much more than if I prime them myself, and the quality is better. Framing is another time sink that I try to avoid and I think collectors appreciate being able to choose the style for themselves.

Commercial Slip
(click to see original image)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

Ideas for paintings are everywhere. I like the idea of making paintings of everyday scenes and objects. If I waited for the perfect subject matter to show up then I would never paint.

I work mostly from photographs, but I don't like the idea of copying a photograph exactly. I consider it a starting point, like a sketch, and I make whatever changes I feel will improve the painting.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I make a game of it by switching to a different medium or by working in a different size. I recently completed a series of small paintings, commonly known as Artist Trading Cards. The small size requires a different approach so it's a good diversion from my regular paintings.

If I get tired of coming up with for new reference material to paint from I will work on a larger painting to keep me occupied for awhile. This gives me additional time to build up a catalog of photographs to paint from in the future. I like to have a few images ready to paint and this helps me to eliminate a few of the weaker ideas. They just seem to never get painted and I eventually forget about them.

If I don't feel like painting, I remind myself that after about ten minutes of getting started the resistance will disappear and I will start to enjoy the work. A good audiobook or podcast can also help me when I'm not feeling motivated because I can look forward to listening to it while I paint.

Country Walk
(click to see original image)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I'm currently learning a lot about marketing and the business side of art which is very time consuming. I feel like I spend more time marketing than I do painting!

As far as painting techniques are concerned, I've been learning about watercolors rather intensively for the past six months or so. Most of my previous watercolors ended up in the garbage! This past summer my brother and I were determined to improve our watercolor skills. We had fun trying out different brands of papers and paints. I've learned from working in other mediums that the materials you chose have an impact upon the results. They don't necessarily have to be the best or most expensive but it's useful to do some research and experimentation to figure out what works best for your style.

What makes you happiest about your art?

I think it's the process that I enjoy most, I really enjoy learning new things and playing around with paint in my studio. When I'm working, I often lose track of time and become absorbed in my work. Painting can also be very difficult and frustrating at times, but I think that's part of what makes it so compelling. If it were easy, it would be boring.

Thanks, Chris!

© 2015 Sophie Catalina Marine

Thursday, February 19, 2015

DPW Spotlight Interview: Liz Maynes

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. 

To enter to win Liz's painting, "Citrus Arrangement" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I loved to draw when I was growing up. The drawing kind of evolved into experimentation with painting. By the time I reached grad school in university, I was able to sell my work at a local community market to help pay some of my tuition. At this time, I also got involved in community painting auctions and festivals - from these experiences my interest in painting just kept growing!

Citrus Arrangement
(click to see original image)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Liz's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

Well, I am actually a medical doctor in training- something I am very dedicated and committed to. So for many years, I was unable to paint because of my hectic schedule. I have managed to balance things in a way that allows me to paint in the free time I have.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I have tried using both acrylic and oil paint. For quick sketches, I love the painterly aspects in using charcoal. For genres, I've experimented with just about everything.

The Race
(click to see original image)

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

I like the convenience and water solubility of acrylic paint, but my ultimate goal is to apply what I have learned through acrylic in terms of design, value and color palettes to my use of oil paint.

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

Most of the time, I put my ideas on paper before I start a painting. For challenging subject matter, I might draw an image over ten times before I attempt it with the brush. Drawing to me is the most important aspect of a painting.

Tumbling Tangerines
(click to see original image)

Who or what inspires you most?

My husband! He is so supportive and loving. We are both inspired by great works of art of the past. Canadian greats like Tom Thomson, Clarence Gagnon and George Bridgman appeal to me, and of course the Group of Seven!  Some of my other favorites include:  Sorolla, Mary Cassatt, Anders Zorn, Toulouse Lautrec, Degas; there are so many. I also want to mention DPW and Carol Marine - the teamwork and creativity they put into maintaining the site is super inspiring!

What does procrastination look like for you?

I have been wanting to take more painting workshops, but I keep putting it off.  It's definitely on my list of things to do.

Little Water Collector
(click to see original image)

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

To keep things fresh I practice drawing a lot. I draw anything and I draw everyday. I love to draw!

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

To create a painting that I am satisfied with, I trust my gut feelings and intuition more and more. It has become the most important tool to help me judge my own work.

Cold Chicago Winter Day
(click to see original image)

What makes you happiest about your art?

Painting makes me feel so alive! I am glad I have finally managed my time in a way that allows me to paint. I also experience a strong sense of gratitude whenever I create a piece of art. There are so many things to be thankful for.

Thanks, Liz!

© 2015 Sophie Catalina Marine

Thursday, February 12, 2015

DPW Spotlight Interview: Amy Schimler-Safford

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. 

To enter to win Amy's painting, "Roses and Berries" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Amy's DPW gallery page:

I studied textile design and painting at Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston, MA. I work as a children's illustrator by day and have returned to my passion of painting these past few years. I work predominantly in oils, alla prima style. Color is very important in my paintings as well as my illustration work. I hope you enjoy my work, thanks so much for stopping by. (click to view bio)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I have done artwork ever since I can remember. I dabbled in painting with oils on and off as a teenager and then when I was in my twenties, I took a class. I went back to art school at age thirty to study painting but wound up focusing on textile arts. I didn’t get back to it until two years ago in my late fifties. I wondered all of these years what my painting voice is.

Roses and Berries
(click to see original image)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Amy's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

Many, the typical life interruptions – starting a family, work obligations, and I also had some medical issues layered on top of that.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I have worked with gouache and acrylic in my work (I am an illustrator by day) and also have done collage and monoprint.

Trio
(click to see original image)

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

I still love working with gouache; love the printing process too. I just don’t have time to do everything I want to, so for now I have made a commitment to oils.

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I feel like my journey with oils has just begun.

Who or what inspires you most?

Color, color, color – shapes, nature, interesting moments where colors meet.

Persimmons
(click to see original image)

What does procrastination look like for you?

It used to be an interruption when I was just getting started, but I think that had a lot to do with not being comfortable with the medium. It was hard work and a lot of hits and misses and feelings of discouragement.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Now that I feel I am over the first hump of the challenge of learning something new, I look forward to it. I make sure to paint weekly.

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I just look to see what inspires me. I went through a period where I was drawn to all of the fall vegetables in Whole Foods.

Saturday Peonies
(click to see original image)

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

Studying with painters I admire, trying to understand what I respond to. Recently when I paint, each time is a different experience, I try to let go and trust the process. I remind myself to look, to see color, to see the light and to see the dark.

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

How to push color and light. How to let go. How to keep a brush stroke meaningful and expressive. What to include, what to leave out.

Friday's Flowers
(click to see original image)

What makes you happiest about your art?

Doing it, sharing it and playing with buttery color for hours at a time.

Thanks, Amy!

© 2015 Sophie Catalina Marine

Thursday, February 5, 2015

DPW Spotlight Interview: Charlotte Yealey

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. 

To enter to win Charlotte's painting, "Rooster" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Charlotte's DPW gallery page: 

​I am a professional artist and my love for nature shows in each painting. York Academy of Arts was part of my training. I opened my own pet grooming business and painted portraits of pets for over 20 years and now that my daughter runs the business, I now paint full time when I am not visiting local nursing homes and schools with my Therapy dogs. I am a member of the Colored Pencil Society of America, Pennsylvania watercolor Society and Daily Painters of Pennsylvania. (click to view bio)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I have been painting (especially dogs and animals) since I was in grade school because I grew up on a farm. My school art project subjects were always animals and spent a lot of my spare time drawing dogs, cats and other animals on the farm. After high school I attended York Academy of arts.

Rooster
(click to see original image)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Charlotte's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I put my art away a few years after marriage and when my children were babies but started painting again at night after they would go to bed. I spent weekends at the art and crafts shows with my dad who was a wood carver.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I have tried just about every medium including stained glass but I always go back to oil painting, colored pencil drawing and pastel. I love to be able to get the fine detail in my art and sometime combine mediums to achieve it. I have worked a little with clay sculpture but would like to set aside more time to master it.

Zebra Look
(click to see original image)

Who or what inspires you most?

My father the wood carver and an aunt who was a watercolorist have inspired me the most but when I see a photo realistic artists work, I am greatly inspired to work harder.

What does procrastination look like for you?

I think all artist face procrastination at one time but with me it is mostly the paperwork and bookkeeping of the art business. I would rather be painting or drawing. I do have to set studio hours so that I keep up with the demand of suppling two galleries, enter competitions and complete my commissions.

Two English Springer Spaniels
(click to see original image)

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I was once asked "How do you know what to paint?" I always say "That is easy! I keep my camera with me at all times and always stop to photograph an animal looking cute, a bird at my feeder or any other inspiration that crosses my path".

Turtle
(click to see original image)

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I feel exploring new combinations of mediums and subjects in my art keeps me reaching for new goals and possibilities in my creative thoughts. Artist never stop learning, with each painting there is a new lesson learned.

Borzoi
(click to see original image)

What makes you happiest about your art?

I am blessed to be able to create art that makes people smile.

Thanks, Charlotte!

© 2015 Sophie Catalina Marine

Thursday, January 29, 2015

DPW Spotlight Interview: Elena Nayman

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. 

To enter to win Elena's painting, "Bouquet" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I am a self taught artist. I started painting ten years ago and instantly fell in love with it. During one year, I took classes with a local artist. She helped me to find confidence in myself. In general, I learn well on my own and this skill helped me move forward with painting as well.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I have painted non stop for the last twelve months. Prior to that, I would paint for a year or two and if I saw no progress in my work I would stop for six months or so and wait for inspiration to come back.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I started painting with acrylics and it was a great experience. I was interested in learning to paint with oils but didn't like using turpentine. About two years ago I have discovered water mixable oil and I love it.

Bouquet
(click to see original image)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the home page announcing Elena's interview.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

I am in love with oils and I think I'll continue to paint with them.

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I am still not settled with my style. I love impressionism as well as modern art. Cityscape is my favorite genre, but I am learning to paint flowers/still life and enjoying that very much as well.

Rainy Day
(click to see original image)

Who or what inspires you most?

Light and shadows fascinate me. I love taking walks alone and observing everything around me. This is a very happy time for me. Some ideas come to me before I go to sleep and once or twice I've had a dream about a subject matter. Going to museums is another favorite inspiration. People who inspire me: Korovin, Fechin, Rembrandt, Renoir, Jeremy Mann and many others.

What does procrastination look like for you?

Self doubt is a huge cause of procrastination for me.

Childhood Memories, St. Petersburg, Russia
(click to see original image)

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I am so happy when I paint that I make sure to paint almost daily. It doesn't mean that I am happy with all results but it doesn't stop me from coming back to my studio.

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

It is difficult to say. I look through my photos time and again and eventually get a feeling that this is the one I'd like to paint today or tomorrow.

City Tram
(click to see original image)

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I enjoy painting. I am never upset, angry or frustrated if I cannot get a satisfactory result. I see no problem with getting a palette knife and scraping paint off of a canvas if I see that this project is not going to work. As with life itself, I see painting as a learning process and always look forward to something new. I am amazed to see how a brush or palette knife can place paint onto a white canvas to create color, light, and shadows. The features join together and something new emerges before my eyes.

Light and Shadows in a Morning City
(click to see original image)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

There is so much beauty in nature and simple everyday things that I can capture on canvas. I can say that it is never too late to learn anything if you set your mind on it. One should not strive for perfection but to learn to enjoy whatever is here and right now.

What makes you happiest about your art?

The process of painting is the most important part of my art. When I paint, nothing exists anymore and the whole world vanishes.  In that moment only the canvas, oils, brush or palette knife and myself represent all of it.

Thanks, Elena!

© 2015 Sophie Catalina Marine