Thursday, March 14, 2019

DPW Spotlight Interview: Marjorie Landrin

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Marjorie painting "Reel Time" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Marjorie's DPW Gallery Page:

I have been making art since I could hold a crayon. Growing up in the time of "abstract art" being taught in schools. I went for something more practical. I studied architectural design and technical illustration which gave me income producing jobs. I picked up art workshops at places such as Scottsdale Artist's School as finances permitted. I've had the usual "stops and starts" with painting that come with life events such as becoming a cardiac RN, caretaker for parents, marrying for the first time at fifty-four to my best friend who like me cannot stand city life. We have built our own house and forged a unique outdoor life in the past eight years. Now is the time for me to get back to my "sweet spot" which is painting. The idea of small Daily Paintings caught my attention and I'm enjoying it. No guilt over wasting a lot of time and money on large paintings the average person can't afford. We'll see where this new journey takes me...

Tell us a bit about how your first started painting.

I don't remember a time when I didn't paint and draw. My first “lessons” came when my Mom decided I should do something other than school at age eight. I was easily bored. The only thing we could find was ballet at the time. That only lasted about two weeks. Then she found an artist that gave lessons to kids and I got to start oil painting. I was in heaven. I loved the smells and the mess and everything about it. I did that when I could in between school and camping with my family.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I had continual stops and starts in my painting. It was never my career since I hated doing commercial art and supporting yourself as a fine artist is not always practical. I first went into technical illustration and architectural design and I even worked in aircraft designing ground support equipment. Then I became an RN. Reality often pushes art to the back for a time. Then you realize that you can't quit painting or your brain stops working as well.

Reel Time
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Marjorie's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I've tried almost all the mediums and my art closet can attest to that. I needed to be able to use most of them competently since I also taught local college classes for a time. I also like to paint any subject that catches my eye.

Which ones have stuck and which ones have fallen away?

I like oil and pastel the best. I've never gotten watercolor to do what I want it to do. I don't have the patience to “leave the whites” but I really admire a good watercolor.

Flaming Desert
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I would like to explore a water-based paint that would act like oil but dry in a day for traveling. I haven't found one that suits me yet.

Who or what inspires you most? 

Nature inspires me the most. I love the effects of light and shadow and the different colors of light.

Young Woman in Denim
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

The longer I go without painting the harder it is to start again. The blank canvas seems to tell me I can't do it. It seems to be some kind of fear of failure reaction. So I either have to paint every few days or it's a major struggle after that.

What techniques work to ensure you make time for your art.

I avoid phones and the computer as much as possible. That's not hard for me to do since I don't like them that much anyway. I try to use my best time for painting and save the chores for when I'm brain dead. I can't have a set schedule because the mini-farm/logging life (www.jdsbirds.com) has to be done dependent on things that can't be controlled or predicted.

Hidden Valley
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I'm usually excited by the light and dark pattern or colors that I see.

How do you keep art “fresh”. What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant & engaging?

I find that I have to switch subjects and techniques frequently or I get bored to death and it shows in my paintings. I admire people that can keep painting similar things over and over to perfect their skill but I don't seem to be capable of that. I tend to want to paint whatever catches my eye.

Saguaro Kings
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I'm trying to teach myself to remember everything I already learned over the years and to quit making the same silly mistakes over and over again such as: Not using enough paint! Cleaning my brush with turps and then using it again before it's totally dry (pulls the paint off the canvas). Not simplifying enough. Too much brushing and not enough looking.

What makes you happiest about your art?

When I get into the zone of painting, everything else in the world goes away and I don't have to think about anything. I just get to be Marge.

Thanks, Marjorie!

© 2019 Sophie Marine

Thursday, March 7, 2019

DPW Spotlight Interview: Marita Hines

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Marita's painting "The Cabana" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Marita's DPW Gallery Page:

I worked for over forty years in non-art related fields, moving from one job assignment to another in an effort to grow and stay engaged. It was both tedious and challenging. When I got the opportunity to retire and pursue painting full-time -- there were doubts that I would be able to maintain a level of engagement without constantly shifting direction. Then I was re-introduced to Plein Air painting! Capturing and translating a fleeting moment in time challenges me in ways my "day job" never could. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I was into drawing from an early age, using my skills to create paper dolls and doll houses. Arts and crafts have been part of my life as long as I can remember. As a teen, I was lucky to have participated in a Saturday art class sponsored by Carnegie University. Although I did not pursue a degree in art, I have taken many workshops and classes over the years.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

After working in a non-art related field most of my adult life, I got the chance to retire and pursue painting full time. Until my retirement in 2015, painting was something I did on occasion to relax or while on holiday. Now that I have time to paint full-time, I still don't know that I'd call it a career.  I sell my work in order to paint more. Nothing makes my day like someone who has fallen in love with one of my paintings and wants to take it home with them.

The Cabana
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Marita's interview.

Who or what inspires you most?

Early on, a mentor introduced me to Plein Air painting. Plein Air is a French term referring to painting in the "open air" or outdoors.  Although my first experience with Plein Air was not a good one, it was memorable. It was a cold, snowy day and my fingers would not cooperate. Yet, there was something so inspiring and challenging about painting outdoors. Van Gogh painted the same haystacks repeatedly -- was he inspired by the changing seasons and time of day? Those things just add to the allure. Today, I belong to two Plein Air groups, including one that I manage.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I have experimented with sculpture, oils, pen and ink, charcoal, gouache and watercolor. There was a period when my work was abstract in nature. My only regret is that it took me so long to figure out it wasn't my thing. Today's paintings are loose and representational. 

Potted Pretties at Longwood Gardens
(click to view)

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

My favorite medium by far is watercolor.  It's perfect for Plein Air painting because it dries quickly, cleans up easily, uses no chemicals or solvents, and is very portable. 

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I start early in the day, because that is when my energy level is at its peak. I try to schedule the less creative work like sending emails and doing paperwork in the evening hours.

Docked
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I take pictures everywhere I go. Most people take photos of loved ones during special events. I take pictures of strangers and beautiful landscapes and architecture. It's not just my vacation photos that are potential paintings. It's the ones I take of everyday life -- the back alleys, old buildings, beautiful gardens, an old man sleeping on a bench.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

It's in my nature to get bored with a regular routine. But there are so many ways to change it up -- learning a new technique, using a new color palette, watching a video, reading a book, checking out a new location to paint.

Afternoon at Landis Valley
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I'm currently working with a limited palette, trying to improve the harmony and innovation of my color combinations.

What makes you happiest about your art?

I enjoy when people make a connection with my art. Sometimes I make a connection with the work of other artists. I'm an artist and an art collector.  In fact, I won a painting from the Daily Paintworks Artist Spotlight.

Thanks, Marita!

© 2019 Sophie Marine

Thursday, February 28, 2019

DPW Spotlight Interview: Jan McLean

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Jan's painting "Charleston Basket Weaver" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Jan's DPW Gallery Page:

Hi, I'm an artist specializing in landscapes. Clouds are especially fascinating to me, as well as the effects of light on the landscape. I try to capture the feeling of a place in my work. (click to view gallery)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I would spend a lot of time as a kid drawing typical little boy stuff like police cars, cowboys and helicopters. One day when I was maybe five or six years old I couldn’t think of anything to draw, so I remember asking my Granny and she suggested I draw the flower garden. I wasn’t sure how to go about drawing a garden so I just tried to draw what I saw instead of drawing “symbols” for things like I had been doing. That way of thinking and seeing that I had stumbled across back then was a bit of a revelation to me. I was fascinated by drawing but eventually I began to feel the need to also explore color because there was simply too much color in the world to ignore. I was in my twenties when I began oil painting and it just seemed to fit.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

Many starts and stops over the years which I like to think of as taking the scenic route. My day job as a graphic designer left little time or energy for painting, but now that I’m retired, I’m able to devote more time to painting and just the enjoyment of making art. I love painting large canvases but I also want to work on some smaller daily (daily-ish) paintings and possibly explore a slightly looser style.

Charleston Basket Weaver
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Jan's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

Lots of graphite drawings, some pen and ink, colored pencil, and watercolor, all of which I love, but I plan to concentrate on oil painting. My style has always been realist but I have tried to make my work not as much about realistic details but about how those details combine to create a cohesive composition.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

I still love drawing, which has the added benefit of being one of the best therapies in the world. Nothing can quiet and clear your mind like spending thirty minutes with a pencil and sketchbook. I think oil painting will always be my favorite medium.

Thunderhead
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

Oil painting offers so many possibilities of expression in terms of color, surfaces, types of brushes, palette knife, thick impasto or wash, etc. It’s one-stop shopping for creative exploration.

Who or what inspires you most?

Nature and how light affects the landscape are constant inspirations. Clouds are some of my favorite subjects to paint and also to just sit and watch. I love seeing what other artists are creating and there are so many incredible artists who are willing to share their thoughts and methods online. I’ve learned a lot and continue to learn from and be inspired by them.

February Evening
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

Some days it’s hard to focus for one reason or another, so I’ll get away from art for a while and go fill up the bird feeders or cook something in my cast iron skillet.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Sticking to a routine helps me. I usually wake up early, make some coffee and start working on a painting. I can usually get several hours of good painting time in before other responsibilities distract me.

Summertime
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I look for interesting light, interesting shapes, subjects that evoke a certain feeling. Usually while I’m looking for ideas, the ideas just seem to find me instead.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

In the past, when painting time was scarce, I would generally begin with a quick outline sketch of a subject on the canvas without much prep work and hope for the best. But, lately I’ve been starting out with some basic thumbnail sketches to work out the composition and become familiar with the subject. This always leads to “what if” ideas—what if this tree were bigger, what if the road went more over this way, what if the shadow was darker, etc.—which makes creating art much more exciting for me.

Miss Lucy
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

Picasso said “It takes a long time to become young” and I feel like I’m starting to understand what he means. Art requires some discipline but at the same time it has to be fun, a sort of controlled abandon.

What makes you happiest about your art?

The entire process of creating art makes me happy. Painting, drawing, stalking clouds, waiting for the right light. I feel lucky to be where I am in my life right now and I’m looking forward to some quality art time ahead.

Thanks, Jan!

© 2019 Sophie Marine

Thursday, February 21, 2019

DPW Spotlight Interview: Eric Hazeltine

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Eric's painting "Composition 17" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Eric's DPW Gallery Page:

Eric Hazeltine received his Bachelor's degree in Fine Art from the University of Wisconsin - Whitewater in 2016. He is currently pursuing his Master's of Fine Art degree and teaching design at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Since a young age, Eric Hazeltine has had an affinity for drawing and painting and could always be spotted with his sketchbook and pencils. Currently, art could be considered his obsession. Working from life has become his passion in recent years which led him to start painting daily still lifes. In his free time he is always reading, researching and experimenting with new ideas in the processes of creating art to further his talents and aid in his studies. (click to view gallery)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I first started painting when I was about sixteen years old. All through my childhood, I was obsessed with drawing so my mother bought me an oil paint set and some canvas knowing it would be something I’d enjoy doing. I eventually took an independent study class in painting as a senior in high school that gave me the basics and the rest is history.


Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?


I’ve had plenty. Long story short, after receiving my associate degree in Arts and Science I was working in the realm of engineering while continuing my schooling in Fine Art at the same time. Throughout this period there were big chunks of time that I wasn’t drawing or painting at all, but after graduating with my bachelor’s degree in Fine Art a couple years ago I decided to make the leap and leave my job of seven years to pursue my master’s degree in Fine Art. Most of my time is now devoted to either teaching/learning/reading about art or simply doing it and I wouldn’t want it any other way.

Composition 17
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Eric's interview.


What mediums and genres have you experimented with?


My work has always consisted of trying out different materials and is a major interest of mine. I’ve done papermaking, woodwork, metalwork, sculpture, etc. Basically, anything I can get my hands on becomes a piece of my work outside of my oil paintings. I’m also pretty open with genres as well and have experimented with too many to list. I’ve had years where I worked strictly non-representationally and long periods of time when I was strictly doing portraiture and figurative work.


Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?


Medium-wise, I always find myself going back to charcoal on paper and oil painting on board. Genres are a little trickier, but I really enjoy working with still lifes, portraiture, or working from the figure. I work almost exclusively from life. If I’m ever working from a photo it’s likely there are major constraints keeping me from working from life or it’s a commission piece that’s based on a photo.

Composition 14
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

There’s nothing in particular that I’m looking to explore at the moment except maybe digging deeper into portraiture. I’ve found this is a harder genre to hold on to since I have such a preference for working from life and strive for realism in my work. It’s not very often I can find someone willing to sit for more than four or five hours at a time.

Who or what inspires you most?


A lot of my current and past teachers are the most inspiring because of their experience in the arts and their amazing work ethic when juggling teaching and their professional art practice week in and week out. It really pushes me to work on becoming a better artist every single day and sets a standard for me that I can only hope to attain.

Composition 20
(click to view)


What does procrastination look like for you?


My procrastination involves cleaning/organizing or building things to help me paint or other artwork. I’m a very meticulous artist when it comes to cleanliness so usually that doesn’t deter me too often since it stays pretty clean and organized in my studio. I’m a huge fan of building and creating things though, so sometimes I put off painting so I can build some cradled painting panels and frames for my work despite not needing them immediately.


What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I’m definitely more productive in the morning so I try to wake up early and get to my studio as soon as possible. This usually gives me a couple hours if I get right to work. You’d think that since I’m in grad school for fine art that most of my time would be spent doing art but that’s not the case most days. Unfortunately, I spend a lot of time doing research, writing, and teaching a design class at the University of Wisconsin instead of spending time in my studio.

Composition 24
(click to view)


How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I’m really interested in colors and the conceptual ideas behind objects. I tend to appreciate things that will change and degrade over time. Knowing that they will never look the same throughout their lifespan really intrigues me. With food products, this idea of degradation is emphasized because their lifespan is a lot shorter than other things I could be painting. I think this is why I tend to include them in my daily paintings so often. I know they won’t last longer than a few days, so I need to finish the painting within one or two sittings, which also helps me to be productive as well.


How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I jump back from realism/abstraction and painting/drawing a lot. This keeps me thinking of new ideas and possibilities of merging them all into one and having this constant stream of things I want to try. Along the same lines as this, my constant need to read and learn new or better techniques always brings me back to the easel to try them for myself. This borderline obsession of learning has given me an ample amount of skills that always seems to be of use even if it seems irrelevant to the work I’m currently doing at that moment.

Composition 27
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

It’s probably because I’m currently in grad school, but I think the conceptual framework for my paintings is in the forefront of what I’m in the middle of learning and figuring out. I’ve been reading a lot about the history of still life painting and have become interested in seeing where that will lead me in my own work.


What makes you happiest about your art?

The process of creation. As long as I’m drawing, painting, or working on some type of artwork, then I’m happy. I can spend 10+ hours just painting or drawing somedays and those are the days I live for, honestly.

Thanks, Eric!

© 2019 Sophie Marine

Thursday, February 14, 2019

DPW Spotlight Interview: Kathy Los-Rathburn

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Kathy's painting "Cool Paintings to Warm the Heart # 12" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Kathy's DPW Gallery Page:

Kathy, a native of Indiana, received her formal art training as a realist in watercolor at the American Academy of Art in Chicago. She holds signature status in the Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois Watercolor Societies and also belongs to many other art organizations. Her love for watercolor and passing on the joy and gratification of the medium to others has gained her teaching experience at the American Academy of Art, Purdue University, and many local art organizations and groups since 1974. She also has been teaching drawing and painting in her studio since 1974. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I don't know when I started to paint, I think I was born with a paintbrush in my hand. Like most kids, I was always doing some kind of art. At sixteen, I remember getting my first "real" set of watercolors. I still have that set. At sixteen I also took an 8-week drawing class with a lady who had classes in her home studio. I knew then that I wanted to do the same when I grew up and I have been doing that for forty-five years.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I would have to say that once I started to paint that I never stopped and I have enjoyed every creative moment.

"Cool Paintings to Warm the Heart" # 12
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Kathy's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I always loved watercolor and sketching. I have been trying some acrylics the last few years and I am enjoying working with them.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

I do have some really nice large sets of pastels, but I never really got into them. I could never understand how they can get such detail with them. To me they were always messy and I never could figure out how the pastels would stick to the paper.

Streets of Chicago XII - Skating Under the Bean
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?


I recently bought a selection of oil paints. I have never painted in oil but I always admired the work that I saw here on DPW in oil. So I went and bought the oils that mix with water and I hope I can adjust to them. We will see.

Who or what inspires you most?

The person that inspired me most in watercolor is Irving Shapiro AWS who was my instructor at the American Academy of Art in Chicago. Now I am inspired by so many water color artists that I have met on FB and Instagram. I am amazed by so many of them and what they are doing. Watercolor has come such a long way and so have the pigments.

Peonies
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

Procrastination? That word is not in my vocabulary. I am more the opposite... I am obsessed and I do not know how to stop.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

My time for my art is a bit unusual... I love the night so I work from 10pm 'til about 5am. Sometimes I start even earlier. During these hours everyone is sleeping so no one bothers me and I am not going to go out in the middle of the night. Perfect time to paint.

Beets
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

Since I do not like to travel, my subject matter is usually found within an hour of my home. It is amazing how much subject matter that I have in the area where I live. Since I am mostly a landscape painter, I love painting Chicago scenes, Industrial landscapes, the Dunes, and the many farmlands that are near me. My ideas come to me from photo shoots when I venture out to all of my favorite places.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I don't know why I don't get burned out. I just love what I do so I just want to keep doing it. Wish there were more hours in the day. Sometimes trying new paint, colors, brushes, or paper excites me.  Sometimes I will challenge myself to try new subject matter. I have had many shows and that is definitely a way to keep you fresh and motivated.

Waiting to Hear From You
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

Right now as an artist I am at the point where I paint because it is my passion. If someone likes my work, GREAT. If they don't, that's OK, too! I am not trying to please anyone. I am trying to be true to myself and to please me. I try to make each painting the best that I can and hope that the next one will be better yet. I try to keep growing for self fulfillment.

What makes you happiest about your art?

What makes me happiest... the more I paint, the more I paint!

Thanks, Kathy!

© 2019 Sophie Marine

Thursday, February 7, 2019

DPW Spotlight Interview: Betty Felenchak

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Betty's painting "Ring Dings" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Betty's DPW Gallery Page:

"Every artist was at first an amateur"
-Ralph Waldo Emerson

I started painting in the fall of 2014 after being inspired by the book Fail Fast, Fail Often, by Ryan Babineaux. I have taken some lessons and followed YouTube tutorials. I am currently taking a class with Sean Beavers at Sanctuart Arts in Elliot, Maine. I have a full-time job as a software engineer.

I am attempting to do "daily painting" as a way to move forward in my art journey.

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

Two things happened about 4 1/2 years ago that got me started painting.  The first is that a friend started painting fairly seriously after years of hardly painting while his kids were young.  He started posting these great paintings to social media at about the same time as I was reading the book, "Fail Fast, Fail Often" by Ryan Babineaux.  This book discussed how adults don't like to try new things because we don't like to fail, but that failure is an integral part of learning any new skill.  Someone can't expect to play a Chopin Nocturne when they first start piano lessons, but instead must be happy with "Mary had a Little Lamb". I decided that since I had always wanted to be able to paint, I should just begin, with the understanding that my first couple hundred paintings were going to be bad, but that I would try to learn from each one.

I took some lessons from local teachers, and also followed along with a bunch of YouTube tutorials.  (Thank you Angela Anderson and Cinnamon Cooney for all your virtual lessons.)  And yes, a LOT of my early paintings were really bad.  But over the years I have seen progress.  I am currently taking lessons from Sean Beavers at Sanctuary Arts in Elliot, Maine.  (See some of his work here: https://www.artsy.net/artist/sean-beavers).


Ring Dings
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Betty's interview.

What does procrastination look like for you?

It looks exactly like a Samsung Galaxy S7 phone.

I can always find something to do such as scrolling thru social media or art websites such as Daily Paintworks, playing games, or searching though photo websites for ideas to paint.  Watching other people paint on YouTube tutorials is a great way to put off actually going to the easel myself.

What makes you happiest about your art?

Because I haven't been painting all that long (4.5 years), sometimes I stand back from a work, and I am amazed that it looks like what I am trying to do!  Also, it is really satisfying when people like my work.  And if they like it enough to buy it, I am over the moon.  But what has been the most satisfying is to see that I am making progress in my art journey.  I have been working hard at it and I can see improvement.   I am an engineer in my full-time job, so painting unlocks a different section of my brain and allows me to relax.

The Kiss
(click to view)

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

When I first started painting I thought that Water Colors looked easy.  I was so wrong!  I have such admiration for those people who make it look so loose and easy.

I have painted mostly in Acrylic and Oils, going through phases where each was the preferred medium.  For a while I tried Acrylic Pouring, but decided that it was more abstract than I wanted to do. (It was loads of fun, though!).  I also went through a brief period where I tried plein air painting as well.  But again, that is harder than it looks to do successfully.

White Lily
(click to view)

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Currently I am painting mostly in oils on small canvases in the Alla Prima style.  I am trying to do "daily painting", where I try to complete a whole painting in one sitting.  Because I have a full time job, sing in the choir, and (try?) to go the the gym, my time is limited.  My goal is to complete a small painting in this style about 3 or 4 times per week.

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I recently began a class in Representational Oil Painting that will teach me a different method from the Alla Prima method that I currently do.  We will be doing an under-painting and then glazes.  I am looking forward to learning this as I feel that certain paintings need that level of dedication.

I can also recognize that I need to take a drawing class, as I usually trace my design from photos onto my canvas, rather than draw/paint them freehand.  This skill will help with painting from life and plein air.  And someday I would like to get back to learning Water Colors.

This Little Piggy
(click to view)

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I have found that the hardest thing is to just get off the couch and walk to the easel.  Having a goal of at least 3 paintings a week has helped keep me motivated.  I also find that taking a class once a week helps to keep painting in the forefront of my mind.  I had a couple shows (local library and coffee shop) and that was very motivating to have enough quality work to show.

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I am mostly inspired by photos or artwork by other artists.  Sometimes I see a photo that just begs to be painted.  The Facebook group Photos for Artists is great inspiration as the photos are all available for artists to paint with no copyright restrictions.  Sometimes I get into a theme for a while.  Currently I am in a theme of painting food.  Maybe having a New Year's resolution to eat better is the reason I am painting junk food: donuts, cake, cupcakes, ring dings, etc.

Toll House Cookies
(click to view)

What do you most want people to know about you as an artist?

I think what I most want people to know about me is that I am committed to improving my skills and growing.  I am a busy person in the other areas of my life, so I don't have tons of time to make art.  However I am motivated to learn and grow as an artist.  If you check up on my Daily Paintworks website occasionally, hopefully you can watch my progress as I travel along this art journey.  Enjoy!

Thanks, Betty!

© 2019 Sophie Marine

Thursday, January 31, 2019

DPW Spotlight Interview: Lynne Reichhart

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Lynne's painting "New Crayons" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Lynne's DPW Gallery Page:

Lynne Reichhart graduated from SUNY Potsdam with a BA in Computer Science. After 20 years of corporate life, she turned to her passion for art and let her creative side emerge. She found the Munson Williams Proctor School of Art and began taking classes. Lynne has always lived in Upstate New York in a rural setting. Much of her inspiration comes from nature and the beautiful Adirondack Mountains. She has also been lucky enough to travel to Europe with camera in hand for more inspirational subjects! (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I drew and painted as a kid all the time.  I loved to draw my favorite rock stars.  My best gift as a kid ever was an art set that included oil paints, charcoal, pencils, paper and more!  This present really got me into art.  I would create until the wee hours of the morning listening to my favorite radio station.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

After my initial foray into art as a kid, I had a long break with getting a degree in computer science and my 20 year career as a systems analyst.  The deadlines and travel wore me down so I retired and took up art once again after the year 2000. Since then I have been creating art of some sort continuously and opening more on-line venues to sell my artwork.  It has been a fun ride so far and I love it!

New Crayons
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Lynne's interview. 

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

Once I returned to art, I began making ACEO size pieces with colored pencil.  It turned out to be a good starting point since they are only 2.5 x 3.5 inches and didn't require many resources.  I then graduated to  4 x 6 and 5 x 7 size pieces in acrylics or watercolor selling them on eBay.  I eventually took the plunge to 'larger' pieces.  I still work pretty small in comparison to others in acrylic and watercolor.  My style is primarily realism.  With my detail oriented computer background I love to explore all the small details in my paintings.  I have dabbled in abstract work, using collage and paint, but find it very difficult for me.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

I still enjoy creating primarily smaller format art (up to 11 x 14") in a realistic style with acrylic as my favorite medium.  I have added still life subjects to my repertoire and love setting them up with favorite items I have collected.  Landscapes are my second favorite subject.  I rarely use colored pencil anymore except for adding small details to my paintings.  I have decided that abstract is not my thing.  I have two abstract collage pieces of mine that I really love, but have no plans to do more.

Cocktails and Mustard
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I took a workshop using alcohol ink and had so much fun with it.  I purchased supplies, but have never found the time to get back into it.  I also have the supplies to try scratchboard and really want to give it a try.  The problem is that my detailed paintings take me a lot of time to create and there is always another show or commission needing my attention.  Hopefully I can give them a go soon!

Who or what inspires you most?

Even though I tend towards realism, I am inspired by the impressionists such as Monet and Van Gogh.  I also appreciate John Singer Sargent and Hopper.  I am in awe when I visit an art museum and love seeing all the different styles.  The huge paintings in the Louvre just amaze me.  I can't imagine how the artist doesn't get lost in the wall sized canvas.

I live in rural Upstate New York and am inspired by the beauty around me.  The beautiful lakes, waterfalls and mountains nearby feed my creative juices.

Montmartre Circa 1977
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

I have to admit that my favorite way to procrastinate is to spend time on the internet.  I can validate it by calling it marketing, but I need to cut it short.  Once I finally start working,  I am much more motivated.  I do have problems painting longer than a couple hours at a time.  After about 2 hours, I am ready to hang it up - unless I see a problem that needs to be resolved.  I have to fix it immediately.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

My studio is in a corner of my kitchen.  I keep my work in progress up on my easel where I can see it.  At some point it is impossible to ignore!  I  also have 2 groups that I paint with most weeks so that gives me a reason to get off my butt and paint!

Red Poppies Three
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

Since I paint from photographs, I have to admit that cell phone cameras have made this much easier.  I used to be out and about and see a scene that I would love to paint, but had no camera.  Now everyone has a camera everywhere.  Since I love to paint landscapes,  I am always looking for subject fodder when I am traveling, hiking or even just taking a walk.   When it comes to still life arrangements, they seem to just come to me.  I lay eyes on a favorite item in my house and can envision it being part of a fun still life painting.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I find that the best way to keep art "fresh" is to be passionate about the subject.  I really have to be invested in the subject to create a great piece.  Even though I paint realistically,  I still add something of myself to each piece.  I alter a color, eliminate an object or move it around, for example.  I also try to have each new piece be a challenge in some way. For example, it may involve painting a new texture such as the first time I painted glass.

Waimea Canyon
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

There is a large variety of talent and personalities in the 2 groups I paint with.  I find that painting in a vacuum is difficult.  I love to see other artists' work in progress and hear what suggestions they have for my work.  I find that observing how other people see things differently than I do teaches me a lot.

What makes you happiest about your art?

When I finish with a piece and am satisfied that it is resolved to the best of my ability, I am thrilled.  I also love when others appreciate my work.  Selling a piece puts me over the moon.  The fact that a stranger spent their hard earned money on something I created is so fantastic.  Even something as simple as a person 'liking' my painting on Facebook gives me a lift.

Thanks, Lynne!

© 2019 Sophie Marine

Thursday, January 24, 2019

DPW Spotlight Interview: Stuart Glazer

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Stuart's painting "Happy Travels" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Stuart's DPW Gallery Page:

Stuart Glazer is a native of Detroit, MI and currently resides in Boca Raton, FL. He comes from a family of artists and musicians. His grandfather was an accomplished artist who influenced Glazer throughout his early childhood. During his adolescence Glazer took art instruction from regionally-known artists Ben Glicker and Robert Dowd, and majored in art at a high school for the arts in Detroit. Later, Glazer embraced music, following the path of his parents who were both musicians. Glazer's Bachelor's and Master's degrees in music were from Eastern Michigan University. He received his Ph.D. in Fine Arts from Texas Tech University. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting. 

When I was a kid, my grandfather, who was a painter, gave me drawing lessons. Later, I took Saturday lessons with Ben Glicker, a Detroit-based artist, and began learning to paint in oils.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

Yes, I did. While in high school, I gave up art for music. I subsequently made a career as a college music professor and composer. During that time, I continued art endeavors, mostly in pastels. I’ve always been torn between art and music. I subsequently received a Ph.D in Fine Art from Texas Tech University. I chose that program because it included coursework in both art and music. About 15 years before retirement, I started painting again and found I loved it, and I’ve been painting ever since.

Happy Travels
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Stuart's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I enjoy painting with acrylics and have stayed with that. I’ve experimented in many styles chronologically. At first I worked in a style called Linear Expressionism, founded by a friend of mine, the French artist, Jean Claude Gaugy. Next, I was painting in realism. Later, I worked in a style that is sort of neo-cubist and very colorful, almost Fauvist. I still do this style, but have added more colorful expressionistic portraits of musicians (mostly jazz) and other popular icons. I’ve recently added non-objective abstracts to my repertoire. Now I work in three styles – neo-cubist, expressionistic portraits, and abstracts.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Linear Expressionism and Realism have fallen away. The others have stuck.

Asian Autumn
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I’d like to explore abstraction more. I feel that I can also go further with the portraits.

Who or what inspires you most?

The work of other artists inspires me most. Namely, Picasso, Matisse, and some abstract artists as well.

Zen
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

I’ve never had a problem with procrastination.


What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art? 

When I was teaching, I painted in the evening and all day during summers. Since I retired from teaching, I paint just about every day. I feel best when I’m painting.

Jerry Garcia
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I usually make notes or sketches in the morning of what I want to do next, or what I need to do on a piece in progress.



How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

That’s not a real problem for me because I go back and forth in the three styles I work in, although I found lately that more and more I work with palette knives as a new way of working.



John Coltrane
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

Since I got a late start, I’m always learning. Right now I’m still learning about abstraction, how to convey a message without a subject. I find that fascinating. 


What makes you happiest about your art?

Two things make me happy about my art. First, I’m happy when I finish a piece that I feel is really good. Second, when I’m working on something and it’s really going good, as if the piece is painting itself. That feels really good.

Thanks, Stuart!

© 2019 Sophie Marine

Thursday, January 17, 2019

DPW Spotlight Interview: Bhavna Misra

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Bhavna's painting "Superbloom" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.


From Bhavna's DPW Gallery Page:

Bhavna is a fine artist and an art educator working out of her Bay Area based art studio in California. She paints portraits, wildlife, nature, and everything that appeals to her. She specializes in creating custom artwork suitable for home and office. Oil has been her choice of medium for most of the recent works and she also uses pastels, acrylic and colored pencils. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I started to paint from an early age. When I was about 9, we had my grandfather’s friend, an artist of great renown, visit us. With him, a lot of interest associated with arts entered into our household – he’d paint, draw, and talk about the arts. I watched him paint and sketched alongside. Before leaving, he admired my drawing skills at great length and mentioned noticing never seen before raw talent in me, to my parents. His recognition brought immense joy to my family and a sense of confidence in me for my craft. That day on, my artistic endeavors were supported unconditionally.

I grew up in the hilly, mountainous region near the Himalayas and was fortunate to explore and illustrate to my heart’s delight. My mother helped me understand the advantages and limitations of different media and stressed on the need of a strong foundation of drawing. I was especially drawn to sketching faces and practiced everyday.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I graduated with a college degree that led me to a career in the field of Science and Technology. I painted on the side, but did not ‘exhibit’ art formally for the longest time. Somewhere down the line, I decided to display my work in student shows at the local community college where I took art classes. That experience motivated me to open my body of work up for public display. Since then, I have been showing my work in art galleries, museums, and juried shows. Art and Science, both fields compliment each other and help me follow a balanced approach.

Superbloom
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Bhavna's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

Oil has been my medium of choice but I also use pastel, acrylic, and occasionally, watercolors.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

I do not use charcoal very often, simply because it requires continuous finger cleaning.

Staying Away from Sugar
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I hope to develop deeper understanding of oils and effects of its relative color placements.

Who or what inspires you most?

The interesting compositions! Be it portrait, landscape or anything else. I feel engaging elements give the right start to a work, upon which colors, contrasts, and techniques can be experimented.

Who Pushed Me?
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

Planning ahead as much as possible helps. Giving a cushion of time under the deadlines help me set the practical timer. I do leave a lot to the last minute but I am working on it.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I like to keep a monthly journal of goals for my art career. It is divided into weekly and then daily tasks. At the end of every day, I review it, to make sure my goals are checked off the list. I keep a set time dedicated for studio practice.

Social media is a great tool to make a public commitment, such as art challenges. So, I try to make use of it to stay motivated.

Confetti Forest
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

To choose the subject for the day, I am not very strict. Whatever makes me excited at the start of the studio time gets painted that day. I kind of like to surprise myself!

Having said that, I like to work in series. That helps me repeat a common theme over and over again. Also, I choose the area I need to practice on and focus on that across the genres. For example, if I need to understand the color relationship of pink against other hues in the spectrum, I would experiment with landscapes, still life, and portraits using those colors. Once I am satisfied with what I was looking for, I move on to next learning goal.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

Moving across the genres, or type of the subject helps. Sometimes I take a break and use that time for less artsy stuff like varnishing and organizing and such. Stepping back to basics always helps.

Anaar
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I am trying to explore ways to make art more accessible to public. For this, I have started an Art in Community program. The aim is to display art for wider audience by exhibiting it at less formal settings such as coffee shops, lobby areas, and public transport. I am making collaboration efforts with the local businesses to be part of it.

What makes you happiest about your art?

Everything! Art has the power to bring joy, enforce a sense of accomplishment, strengthen community engagement, and make a lasting impression. I am very fortunate to have received the ability to make theme-oriented, meaningful work and when it resonates with someone, it makes my efforts worthwhile.

Thanks, Bhavna!

© 2019 Sophie Marine