Thursday, April 28, 2016

DPW Spotlight Interview: Elizabeth Elgin

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Elizabeth's painting, "Sun Dappled Cow" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Elizabeth's DPW Gallery:

I love to paint! Period. Although I won the annual art award my senior year in high school (long long ago), "life" got in the way of my pursuing an art career. When I turned 60 I just decided to start; to learn as best I could. I am a member of the "It's never to late to start club". Thank goodness for the internet - so many wonderful art videos available. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

Once upon a time, long, long ago, when I was in high school, I had the very best art teacher, dear Mrs. Glass. She encouraged me and was the first to tell me I had something worth pursuing regarding making art. Then life happened. I always did arts and crafts, and even took some college night classes in drawing in my thirties, but seriously pursuing my artistic side didn’t happen until about six years ago.

Sun Dappled Cow

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Elizabeth's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I can’t say my painting “career” has actually started yet. I’m still in the learning stage and although my artwork does sell, thanks to DPW, I certainly can’t quit my day job. But learning is its own joy and the curve is steep when you have limited time to paint.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I started with acrylics and then moved to oils, and use both, depending upon the subject matter. Sometimes, I start with acrylics to work out the underpainting and finish with oils. I did take a few watercolor lessons and would love to do more with that as well. I love painting animals, still life, skies, water... everything really.

Goodnight Sun Take 2
(click to view)

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Watercolor, graphite drawing, colored pencil, pastels – haven’t really fallen away so much as have been put on hold while I try to improve with painting mediums.

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I am currently looking forward to a workshop in May on paintings miniatures at the 1/6 scale; and then in June learning the indirect oil painting method for contemporary realism. I would like to try plein air but then I read about the heat, the wind, the bugs... maybe not.

Ladybug Ladybug
(click to view)

Who or what inspires you most?

Ah, the inter-webs. I love to look at the artists of both the past and present; my difficulty is that I love all different styles. There’s an ‘x factor’ in some art that just hits you, like your mind has met the artist’s mind and that painting moves you in some way. And not even all the art from that same artist will hit you. So I can’t explain it. When you see it, you suck wind for a second. There is no lack of inspiration to be found, from art to nature; from the way the sunlight shines through the window, to the way my dog looks at me.

What does procrastination look like for you?

I love ‘starts’. Blocking in a new painting when the idea is so fresh in my mind. Then comes problem solving... losing steam and confidence that I can finish... I sometimes have to set a painting aside for weeks, months, sometimes a year, until I feel I might be able to bring it to conclusion. But procrastination in finishing sometimes pays off. Often the problem that needed solving gets answered in a course I happen to take, or a blog I’ve read online. But I have lots of ‘starts’ sitting around. Sometimes I just have to decide it’s just a no-go and trash it.

Breakfast Reflections
(click to view)

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Actually, I need a technique to ensure that I make time for housekeeping and cooking and doing laundry as my art imposes on those things. Those things slide, not my art time. As I still work full time, I often am too tired at night to paint. If I do paint on weeknights, the problem is I get excited and keep going and suddenly it’s 1:00 am and my morning alarm is set for 5:30. So mostly I really focus on my weekend time slots and look forward to it all week.

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

This is funny to me. I see people on Facebook ask “I want to paint but what should I paint?” My problem is the opposite: how in the world can I ever paint all the things I want to paint? The availability on the internet of copyright free reference photos is massive, so the ideas are never-ending. Something catches my eye, or moves me in some way; I ‘see it’ in my mind as a painting, and have a little excitement inside to see it executed. Sometimes it even works out.

Lilacs in Copper
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I just finished two classes at The Compass Atelier, oil painting and mastering color. Color mixing, seeing values, seeing subtle color shifts, warm vs. cool, those basics I need to learn to get the results I want. Also, we see so much these days about ‘painting loose’ and I have tried to pursue that but I’m not sure it’s really in my Virgo-detail-oriented nature. I took an online course and the instructor posted two paintings, one very loose and painterly, and one almost hyper-realistic. He was trying to make the point that the loose style was more appealing, but I kept looking at the realistic one and thinking... maybe not – for me. So I’m taking a class in June with Cindy Procious in traditional methods of indirect painting in realism. Those are the type of paintings that take my breath away, so I want to pursue that this year. So one thing I’m learning is what is the style that I really like, and not to let others ‘should’ all over me. Someday maybe I’ll have ‘my style’.

Garuda Aviary Fundraiser - Sir Winston
(click to view)

What makes you happiest about your art?

When I get a note from someone who has purchased my art, or commissioned a pet portrait, and the painting has really moved them. I’ve had people tell me “Oh, your chickens brought back such fond memories of my grandma’s farm”, or even that they cried when they got their pet portrait in the mail. Those are the moments you feel, ah, the struggle is worth it.

Thanks, Elizabeth!

© 2016 Sophie Marine

Thursday, April 21, 2016

DPW Spotlight Interview: Jean Fitzgerald

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Jean's painting, "Geraniums" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Jean's DPW Gallery:

Jean Fitzgerald is a North Carolina impressionist painter. She received her BA in Art from Western Kentucky University and also studied at the Corcoran College of Art and Design, and with Jack Beal and Sondra Freckleton. She taught watercolor workshops, and sold her artwork at outdoor art festivals and in galleries in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Virginia and North Carolina. She has worked in oils, watercolors, and acrylics. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I have been engaged in art for most of my life.  I have a BA in Art Education from Western Kentucky University and pursued further studies at the Corcoran College of Art and Design.  During the nineties, I sold my work at outdoor art festivals and then in galleries in North Carolina.

Geraniums

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Jean's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I stopped painting for twelve years while I taught full time, and I have returned to painting since I retired five years ago.

Lavender Fields
(
click to view)

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

Over the years, I have worked in water colors, acrylics, oil pastels and oils.  I am currently painting landscape, still life, florals and abstracts.

Who or what inspires you most?

The artist I most admire is John Singer Sargent because of his use of light.  By carefully controlling the values in his paintings, the works seem to glow.  I attempt to achieve this glow in subjects by using backlighting.

Orange Reflections
(
click to view)

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I paint in the morning before I start anything else in order to assure that I have adequate time to work.

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

My garden, travels, and the landscape of the South provide me with my subject matter.  I have photographed interesting possible subjects over the years, but I only rely loosely on the photo reference.

Dimensions
(
click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I continue to explore dramatic lighting and to push myself to eliminate unnecessary details while using expressive brushwork.  I am also making videos to share with other artists my working methods and how I use oil paints without solvents. I am married to the author, Michael Hammonds, and we reside in North Carolina and Ohio.

Peach Flowers
(
click to view)

What makes you happiest about your art?

I am happiest with my paintings that have drama and interesting brushwork.  I attempt to keep them fresh by avoiding excessive detail and by not overworking them.


Thanks, Jean!


© 2016 Sophie Marine

Thursday, April 14, 2016

DPW Spotlight Interview: Annabel Chance

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Annabel's painting, "No. 37 Deer" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Annabel's DPW Gallery:

Hello! My name is Annabel Chance. I work traditionally in opaque and transparent watercolors. I'm inspired by nature and wildlife to create my colorful paintings. If you have any questions or comments I'd love to hear from you :)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I'm from Florida and have had the pleasure of seeing the Gulf and being around nature from a young age. I've been told that I started finger-painting what I saw at the beach to show my parents before I could talk.

No. 37 Deer

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Annabel's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

My painting career is still pretty new. I wanted to get some more practice with my watercolors. That's when I signed up for an account with Daily Paintworks to motivate me. I really didn't expect to get so much positive feedback but I'm grateful for all the encouragement.

My wildlife paintings are a return to my childhood where I would just enjoy sketching at the beach or by the bird feeder.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I've had the opportunity to play with oil and acrylic but I think that I have the greatest affinity for watercolor.

Bluebill
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I've been thinking about creating some abstract watercolor paintings.

Who or what inspires you most?

The content of my work is inspired by the animals that I paint: their behavior and personality. Visually, I'm caught between a love of representational art and the abstract. John Singer Sargent is my favorite painter.

Snow Leopard
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

I struggle a little with photographing my paintings and sharing them online. I'm always ready to paint but I don't have the same focus for formatting images, writing descriptions or choosing keywords.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Keeping a space that is ready for me to paint is really important. I make note of ideas for paintings, collect references, and prepare paper in advance so when I have enough time to paint there aren't any obstacles in my way.

No. 36 Chihuahua
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I try to focus on three things in the early stages of my paintings: form, expression and color. I'll decide on an animal I'd like to paint and will attempt to make it instantly recognizable. I study animal behavior and expressions and I try to bring that through in my work. I also try to create a color scheme that is appealing on an abstract level.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I think watercolors are prone to becoming too fussy. I begin with a big wash of color and then I carve out the subject. I don't want to hide that this is a watercolor painting. I love the big abstract splashes of intense color and I've thrown away my masking fluid.

No. 24 Mourning Dove
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I'm learning to do the work that I love. Even though I was told that there wasn't much of a market for watercolor animal paintings, I think that my genuine affection for and fascination with wildlife comes through in my work. Other people that love wildlife have really responded to that.

What makes you happiest about your art?

I have so much focus when I'm painting. I work with purpose and confidence. I used to worry about ruining my painting but now I just respond to whatever the watercolor decides to do. I don't try to control the flow of paint. I rely on it to be unpredictable. It's a unique process to other methods of painting I've tried and it feels like a collaboration with the medium.

Thanks, Annabel!

© 2016 Sophie Marine

Thursday, April 7, 2016

DPW Spotlight Interview: Rentia Coetzee

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Rentia's painting, "Happiness" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Rentia's DPW Gallery:

I have been creating all my life! Combining patterns and colours brought me hours of pleasure! Then I discovered painting, Pandora's box! Grateful to art teachers willing to share and guide! Golden advice, miles on the canvas!!! (click to view)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I had empty nest syndrome six years ago and a great art teacher led me to a full time job and an all consuming passion. I tried to paint years ago but babies and life had other plans for me.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

When I started six years ago I never looked back. I was fortunate enough to get into galleries very soon and that gave me a lot of self-confidence. I paint every day from 8am until 4pm. It is a job that I take very seriously and I love every moment of it.

Happiness
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Rentia's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I paint in all mediums except watercolour. I have a very heavy hand for watercolour. Oils are my favourite at the moment as well as pastel. I use charcoal in all my drawings and inks are so clear and versatile to work with. I love all genres, portraits being my strongest and landscape my weakest although I am working on it.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Everything has stuck like glue except watercolour - not there yet.

My Cat Amy
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I would love to explore mixed media and have an acute yearning for abstracts. Hope to get the opportunity to explore it further.

Who or what inspires you most?

I adore DPW - best discovery I ever made. I absorb and dissect all artworks, look at artists' galleries and really learn. The weekly challenge is great and I try to get to it as often as possible. My husband and children inspire and motivate me every day. They are my biggest fans but harshest critics. I find inspiration in a beautiful or unique photo. My cellphone is always on hand for impromptu photos which I paint asap. Nature and our Creator inspire me every day to improve! I do courses all the time, read art books and watch art dvds!

Lunch 2
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

What is that??? I only procrastinate when I have to cook, clean or do admin! Painting… never!

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I am very strict with my working hours. My husband and kids had to learn the hard way. When I work I don’t chat and I try not to get diverted. I am constantly completing commissions with deadlines. I strive to be happy and fulfilled in all aspects of my life and I hope that shines through in my artwork.

Let's Go Boating
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I am constantly googling pictures and ideas. I get a lot of references from friends on FB. When I see an idea I immediately know that I have to paint it - whether oils, acrylics or pastels.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I look for a different approach and try new mediums. I also try to think out of the box and into something original! I avoid burnout by relaxing with my family, special time with my husband and sleeping well. When I paint I stand with a mirror 3m behind me, that helps me not to get too tight and keeps my paintings fresh!

Kobus
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

Painting shapes with Chantel Barber is the course I am doing right now. What an eye opener. Right now I have arrived at the point where I no longer want to render. I try to get myself into my artwork. Fresh, original and uplifting is what I strive for.

What makes you happiest about your art?

I'm happiest when someone says I have captured a soul or the essence.  An insult to me is when someone says it looks just like a photo. I am ecstatic when I look at a piece and it is just so - even if no one else thinks so!

Thanks, Rentia!

© 2016 Sophie Marine

Thursday, March 31, 2016

DPW Spotlight Interview: Trevor Downes

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Trevor's painting, "203 CLASSIC FLOWERS 5" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Trevor's DPW Gallery:

I have worked full time in the advertising industry for over fifty years... from message boy to operating my own advertising design and finished art studio employing fifteen artists. The majority of my work was design and finished artwork for brochures, catalogues, packaging and press advertising in both colour and black and white. I have been fortunate to have worked in studios in Australia, Canada, U.S.A., England and Germany. I have used the skills I have gained on my travels to produce thousands of designs and pieces of finished artwork. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

When I was a thirteen year old at the local Australian State School, we read a book called “The Drums of Mer” written by Ion Idriess. In the weekly art lesson, we were asked to illustrate something that impressed us from the book. Using our limited range of pastels, we produced our drawings.

Two of my class mates made a lasting impression on me.

One drew a dark storm scene... black clouds, lightning and angry waves crashing onto a tiny outrigger canoe. The other boy drew a soft, azure blue, idyllic, tropical seascape with sunset, islands and palm trees.

They produced two completely different interpretations.                

They had used the same pastels that I had used but their work was so different and exciting.  What a challenge.

I was hooked then and I’m still hooked now.

203 CLASSIC FLOWERS 5
(click to view)


Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Trevor's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

No Stops.  From age seventeen, I have worked as an artist in press, print and packaging combining layout, design, illustration, typography, finished artwork and photo direction. I even wrote copy for radio and T.V. commercials when required for advertising campaigns.


My first paid job was for a chiropodist who needed signs to be placed on the risers of the steps up to her rooms.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I have used most mediums and my work is realistic/impressionism.

223 ORIGINAL LIFE SKETCH 7
(click to view)

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Pencil, charcoal, oil pastel and acrylic are favourites but I will test drive anything new.

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

Computer graphics. There’s a whole new world out there. It’s just a different pencil.

Who or what inspires you most?

“Have a go” is a great Aussie saying and people who “have a go” inspire me. It doesn’t matter what field they are working in.

040 PARKS & GARDENS 8
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

Procrastination is something I don’t know much about. I’m happiest when I’m busy and I always have half a dozen projects on the go.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Art is my life. I do find time to play golf twice a week, swim twice a week and look after our grandchildren whenever needed. If I’ve been very busy and can’t get into my studio during the day, I can work through the night to satisfy my creative urge.

143 MOD GIRL 2
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I really don’t know. They just keep coming. I am able to design and paint in my head and I like nothing better than to dream of painting.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I get disappointed when something I have worked on doesn’t work out to my satisfaction. Having worked to extremely tight deadlines in advertising, I know I can’t win them all so I just have another go.

122 FLOWERS ABSTRACT 2
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

Learning to enjoy myself and paint for my own pleasure gives me a great feeling of freedom.

What makes you happiest about your art?

Finishing a painting to the best of my ability. It amazes me as to which paintings get the most hits on the DPW website. It gives me joy to have the grandchildren ask me to “show them how to paint.” To pass on that love of drawing is a gift all around.

Thanks, Trevor!

© 2016 Sophie Marine

Thursday, March 24, 2016

DPW Spotlight Interview: Paulette Farrell

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Paulette's painting, "Snow Spaniel" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Paulette's DPW Gallery:

I am a sports and portrait artist living in Cheshire, England who loves drawing sports scenes involving movement. I sold my first professional drawing in May 2014, since then the demand for my cricket & sports drawings have increased dramatically, becoming collectibles. I am now a professional artist working from my home studio. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I did not start drawing until my late thirties.  My children were given a box of oil pastels for free, nobody seemed interested in using them so I thought I would give them a go.  I was not sure how to use them so then began a journey into discovering mediums, how to use them, what they look like in a piece of art.  I think I am still on that journey six years later but interestingly, I do not use oil pastels anymore.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

Not so far, once I started I have never stopped.  Some days are quieter than others though.

Snow Spaniel
(click to view)
Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Paulette's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

Quite a lot.  I initially used oil paints which I really love but soon shelved due to young children and the length of time it takes to dry. I have used watercolours, charcoal, soft pastels and pastel pencils.  With genres, I have tried landscapes, still lives, portraits and figure drawings.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Watercolours quickly fell away; I did not like the fixed nature of them as I like to change my mind.  My artists eye has improved greatly and I won't stick with a piece if it doesn't feel right.  I have to keep changing it until I am happy.  Oil paints I hope to try again with now that I have my own studio space.  My true loves though are charcoal and pastels.  I work with both.  Charcoal is fantastic for doing my sports drawings, it allows me to show movement really well.  I also feel pretty smug that I can accomplish something wonderful with a stick of wood and a piece of paper.  Pastels and pastel pencils are also a great medium, they allow me to be flexible and I love the subtle blends.

Whippet Style
(click to view)

For genres, from the moment I started to draw I wanted to do portraits.  I think I liked the romantic ideal of having a sitter and drawing them.  This is something I have not done enough as I tend to work from digital photos more than anything.  My sports drawings come from my love of sport - particularly cricket and hours spent watching my children play.  I love the twist of bodies and the awkward shapes that sports people get into.  My pet drawings came from commission requests.  They were going well, but I always got really nervous when a new commission request comes in. I try to draw independently some tricky animal drawings to help my drawing.  I found I liked sourcing my own beautiful images and transforming them into art.

Who or what inspires you most?

A great or interesting pose, a moment in a sports event that captures movement and a key turning point.  The artists I love are those who represent beauty in art, who bring out the wonderful elements that we all see.  I love Renoir and Rembrandt and Carl Larsson.

Silhouette
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

I had to look up what procrastination means, I think it means distraction or putting things off.  I have not drawn this weekend because I have spent almost all of it discovering lightroom and photoshop, only by chance because I wanted to know how to show my scanned drawings with a white background.  That led to three days kind of wasted but not really because I know a bit more now. So for me, I am guilty of going off on tangents and not staying focused. That said, it is probably a tangent that I needed to take.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

This is a constant angst for me.  I work part time as well as having three teenagers, a dog and two cats.  I find it hard to settle down to draw when I know that there is other stuff to do.  The best thing that I have found lately is to ensure I work on a timetable.  I have three art days in a week and I now have those three days carefully planned to fit in website/email work, drawing, framing and promoting. The difference was immediate when I began to follow my timetable: a clearer mind with everything running fairly well.

Grace
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I am a great lover of Pinterest, Twitter and Instagram.  I follow a lot of sports contacts and I am always on the look out for great moments caught on camera.  I draw from life when I can, a sketch pad at a cricket match is a wonderful way to people watch.  The animal drawings are easy inspiration, as they are so lovely, the more natural looking the better though.  I prefer to capture certain 'looks' or moments with animals and people.  Probably the most common theme that captures my eye is movement, the more complicated the better!

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

Again a differing of opinion.  Good advice I have read is to stick to what you are good at or enjoy and become brilliant at it or completely contrary advice is to keep trying new things to maintain your interest and passion.  I tend to do the latter.  I like to keep up to date with new materials and techniques, I follow many artists and publications, go to galleries, etc.  It's what I like to see in other people's work that makes my own style and if I keep on admiring and evaluating other people's art then mine also improves.

Black Prince
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I've recently taken up graphite drawing in order to improve my sketching skills.  Never a big lover of graphite, which I felt tended to look dull and dirty, it has come as a surprise how much I love it and indeed I am now marketing it as a new medium/style for me.  I think being able to use charcoal so well has helped me take up graphite so easily.  Also, I have recently discovered Nitram charcoal which is wonderful and allows me to be more accurate whilst still retaining the soft beauty of charcoal.

What makes you happiest about your art?

When the finished piece is the same image or better than the picture I had in my head.

Thanks, Paulette!

© 2016 Sophie Marine

Thursday, March 17, 2016

DPW Spotlight Interview: R Kwong

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Rita's painting, "Roses Are Yellow" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Rita's DPW Gallery:

Hello, This is Rita from Hong Kong.

Attracted by the tomato cover from Carol's "Daily Painting"; amazed and inspired by Carol's skills, ideas and suggestions; impressed by David's website and here I am. This is a great way to push myself to practice more and improve. Thanks for the setting up the platform and thanks for visiting my gallery. (click to view gallery)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

It's been my dream to learn Chinese painting since I was little but it wasn't until fourteen years ago that I had the opportunity to pick up Chinese painting.  I was lucky to have found a great teacher.  It’s been a slow yet amazing journey.

Roses Are Yellow
(click to view)
Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Rita's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

There are many down moments when I am not able to do simple stroke the way I want to. Those are the moments that I want to quit but I keep going and realize that there are two things: a) there is something called magic brushstroke where you can create a perfect brushstroke that you are not going to redo again. It's like magic. As such, the more you practice, the more magic strokes you are gonna get.  b) there is something called power minute where concentration is the key.  If you don’t have time to practice, just concentrate and do a few minutes of practice, each day.  It's better to concentrate and practice for short periods of time than to practice long periods of time without concentration.

Early Bird
(click to view)

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I started portrait and figure drawing in pencil, charcoal, oil and acrylic last year.  I totally love the mediums and subject.  Although Chinese and Western mediums and method are different, I see them sharing common grounds and I only wish to try as many as I can for more inspiration.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

I am still exploring different mediums and I don't want to get stuck in a particular one yet.  If I had to pick a medium to get stuck with, it would be Chinese painting.

Daisy-like Chrysanthemum
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

Soft pastel.  I have not tried any soft pastel but already am in love with it.  I am reading Pastel Painting Atelier, hoping to have the time to explore.

Who or what inspires you most?

My husband inspires me the most.  He has semi formal art training while I don't.  He has sharp eyes and he is very honest about my paintings.  No, he doesn’t teach me but his critique is helping a lot.

Baby Chicks
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

I do have trouble with that because I have a demanding full time job.  I basically can only paint on weekends. Joining Daily Paintworks is the key to disciplining myself to paint after work. Thanks again for the Daily Paintworks platform. I only wish I can be determined one day to quit my job and do full time painting.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I set aside weekends for art appreciation.  It sounds strange to need to break apart art and non-art time, but it works for me.  My full time job is very demanding and I don’t get to see daylight on weekdays working in the office.  I need to catch daylight on weekends to do sightseeing, painting, reading or go to art classes.

Yummy
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

From sightseeing.  I pay attention to wild flowers, insects, birds in particular.  I have friends doing bird photography and their photos inspire me a lot.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

Read books.  Go out into nature.  Do photography.  Go to art galleries.  Best thing: go to auction preview - you get to see real paintings from masters!

Wisteria
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

Never give up.  There is never an end to art.  Keep seeing, searching and painting.

What makes you happiest about your art?

When I look at my own piece, I say to myself, humm, that's not bad. I hope my piece brings you joy too. Thank you Daily Paintworks.

Thanks, Rita!


© 2016 Sophie Marine

Thursday, March 10, 2016

DPW Spotlight Interview: Pamela Munger

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings.

To enter to win Pamela's painting, "White Floral" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Pamela's DPW Gallery:

In 2005, I picked up a paintbrush for the first time and have been completely obsessed ever since. The creative aspect is what draws me, therefore abstract appeals to me most, although I do enjoy painting a painterly landscape or still life now and then. I'm not into realism....obviously :) I'm more interested in color and light and breaking the landscape up into simple shapes. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

In 2005, I got a paint set for Christmas and I did my first painting. That was the start of what I had been searching for - to satisfy a need to create.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I haven't stopped painting since that first painting. If too many days go by where I don't paint, I get very restless and sort of depressed.

White Floral
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Pamela's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

One of my downfalls as a painter is that I like to experiment maybe a bit too much. I do mostly acrylics but also oil and watercolor. I'm always trying out different surfaces and mediums and styles of painting. I admit that I get bored with one way of painting and trying different methods keeps it interesting for me.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

I started painting abstracts awhile ago and that definitely stuck. I also developed a much looser and faster style that feels comfortable to me. I stopped trying to paint realism as it left me feeling bored and non-creative. The last few years, my semi abstract floral paintings have been selling well.

Untitled
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I'd like to try so many more things, the options are endless! We plan to move in a couple more years and then I can have a bigger studio and explore doing some really large scale work. I have a strong urge to swing my arm wide with a big brush of goopy paint.

Who or what inspires you most?

I keep an eye on design blogs and what's happening in the d├ęcor world. Second to creating, I like to sell, so I do pay some attention to colors and designs that are trending. I've worked with several designers over the years and used to do a lot of commissions but have scaled back with those as they are time consuming. I'm also inspired by reading about the art world at large and going to galleries.

Blue Muse
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

Too me, painting is mostly about thinking about painting so even though it may look like procrastination as I sit in my chair with a far off expression on my face, it's really all part of the process. Which is to say, I don't feel that I procrastinate much in regards to my art. It's a priority for me, sometimes to the detriment of other things.

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I arrive at ideas through so many different ways, same as other artists. Nature, taking photos, a certain slant of light, a certain color, etc. When you're looking at the world with an artist's eye, the ideas are coming constantly.

Beach Day
(click to view)

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

As I mentioned, I'm always trying lots of different methods in order to grow and keep it fresh and interesting to me. I can't paint just abstracts, or just landscapes or just florals. I would probably be a lot more successful if I could focus more but I try to strike a balance between doing what I like and doing what sells. I'm a self taught artist. I've taken only a few classes because I find that too much instruction really stifles me. I learn best by discovering for myself. So, I waste a lot of paint and have to do a lot of tossing out and repainting but along the way a little learning seeps in.

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I love how painting can tell you who you are as a person. I'm learning how much courage it takes to grow as an artist, how willing you have to be to fail.

All Together
(click to view)

What makes you happiest about your art?

I did a large blue abstract painting a few years ago that I loved and had hanging on my wall for a few months. I sold it to a set designer for the show Mad Men and it was in season seven. That was pretty thrilling. To be able to create and then sell it online, it doesn't get much better than that. Thank you Daily Paintworks for being an awesome venue!

Thanks, Pamela!


© 2016 Sophie Marine