Thursday, September 29, 2022

DPW Spotlight Interview: Jerry Brown

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Jerry's painting "Almost" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

Enter to Win Jerry's Giveaway

From Jerry's DPW Gallery Page: 

My name is Jerry Brown.
 
After 52 years as a traveling showman, I hung up the juggling clubs, extinguished the fire-torches, closeted the ukulele, stuffed the bunny back into the hat, and took up serious water color painting, something that I had dreamed of doing for years, but never had the opportunity.
 
When I started painting in July, 2018, I was simply hoping to paint images that were worth looking at, so that I could paint Christmas gifts for my family, but the minute I took up the brush, it was like déjà vu all over again! The perfect fit: so much so that I have continued to devote 3 to 4 hours per day to exploring this wonderful (and sometimes frustrating) medium, winning numerous awards for excellence over the past four years, and working to master watercolor, one painting at a time.

I hope you find something to treasure.

Almost
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing interview

What did you want to be growing up?

I have always been involved in creative arts: music, theater, and, most recently, visual art.
 
When did your artistic journey begin?  

Like I said, I have always been involved in creative arts. I spent 52 years as a traveling variety entertainer, performing music, magic, juggling, fire-eating, stilt-walking, and working with trained animals, at venues all over the United States. My obsession with watercolor and visual arts started when my showman business got ‘retired’ by Covid-19 and all of my shows got cancelled I had just begun to dabble in watercolor when Covid hit, and I started devoting 3 -4 hours per day in studio, painting.

Lititz Springs Park
(click to view)
 
Did you have any long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?

Never had a period without creative expression since I was making my living as a professional performing artist, but I had always wanted to do something visual, but never really had the chance while I was busy making a living. Why I decided to take up watercolor at the age of 74, I really don’t know, but, as it turned out, it was a very fortuitous choice. From the minute I picked up a brush, it felt like I had always painted.

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal?

I chose watercolor for some unknown reason, but I’m awfully glad I did. I am enthralled by the medium and love experimenting with what water and pigment and gravity can do together.

Giverny Pond
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice?  

I couldn’t tell you. I am still very much in the early stages of exploring, but I am obsessed with watercolor, and devoted to my daily studio time

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why?  

When I decided to take up watercolor, and new absolutely nothing about it, I, of course, turned to my good friend Google and stumbled upon painters who were demonstrating on YouTube, so that’s how I started, with artists like Tim Wilmot, Gary Tucker, Vladislav Yeliseyev, and Joseph Zbukvic: all excellent artists whom I admire greatly.

Incoming
(click to view)

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be?  

Easy:  Paint!
 
Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle?  

I am so passionate about my work, and thankful, at my age, to have something that gets me up in the morning, I have no difficulty focusing on my work. My studio time is ‘sacred’ to me, and I do my best to make sure that nothing intrudes or keeps me away.
 
Extra Virgin
(click to view)

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

When I have a failed painting, and am convinced that I can’t paint, I just remember one of my mentors saying, “It’s only paper.”

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?

Long term and short term are identical: Master the medium.

D.C. Escape
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally?  

Well, I am still pretty much awed by the ‘validation’ of my work when people seek to own my paintings.
 
What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

Being invited, at the age of 78, to be featured as an emerging artist at a well known local gallery. (short list, huh?)

Campus Reign
(click to view)
Thanks, Jerry!

© 2022 Maddie Marine

Thursday, September 15, 2022

DPW Spotlight Interview: Laurie Leehane

 Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Laurie's painting "Cottage Memories" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

Enter to Win Laurie's Giveaway

From Laurie's DPW Gallery Page: 

I was born in St. John’s Newfoundland. I have lived in places across Canada, finally settling back in my native city, St. John's Newfoundland, in 2002. My passion for drawing streets and houses as a child has carried into my professional career. Collections of my art can be found with the City of St. John’s and the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador as well as publication in The Newfoundland Quarterly and “City seen: Artist’s Views of St. John’s”.
I recently moved back to the coastal community of Eastport here in Newfoundland. It has been a big change but I am enjoying beach combing and the quietness of it all.

Statement:

I think of my work as a unique and personal interpretation of the Newfoundland landscape that captures the characteristics and spirit of the land and the people. It is essential in my work for me to have an emotional reaction to a situation or place. My work generally contains a narrative of abandonment, mystery and longing. It isn't what is said that holds my attention but what is NOT said. I aim to create work that deeply touches a viewer’s memory of a moment and to have them connect with the essential feeling I wish to convey in the painting. I believe there is a magical time for everything whether it is the time of day when the light strikes the homesteads and sheds I investigate, or when the landscape is speaking in dreams. Everyone and everything has a moment. I’d like to think I am documenting time and space.

Cottage Memories
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing interview

What did you want to be growing up? 


        When I became a teenager I wanted to be a psychologist and then I wanted to be a writer. I loved creating and as an only child had an imaginative mind.

 

When did your artistic journey begin? 


I entered College at 18 in a commercial art program that lasted three months because I ran out of money. I ended up taking Fine Arts in college in Ontario, Canada at age 22 and that is where my journey really started. After two years there I started University in hopes of being an art therapist. That fell apart as well because of life circumstances. At age 30 or so I met an older woman artist near me who became a sort of mentor and I started filling my days with painting and being part of local shows. When I moved back to Newfoundland I was picked up by a gallery. 

 

Making Plans
(click to view)

Did you have any long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?


I often lose my mojo and feel very disinterested in working. I live with chronic pain from fibromyalgia and spinal disease so it can be easy for me to lapse into months of having no inspiration or energy. It has gotten harder as I get older. I can’t say how I get back on the horse. It just happens generally to my surprise. I can be in terrible pain and yet some creative spark will ignite and I will push through it to get the job done. Lately I have been very busy working on smalls for my DPW gallery and I feel excited about getting to my studio. I feel blessed when this occurs.


Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal?


I use acrylics for my small works and for the underpainting of my gallery art. I love oils and my large pieces are almost always oil. Streetscapes and coastal depictions are generally my gallery art and my smalls can vary greatly. I love crows and also I have done a vast amount of pet portraits. The last few years I have gravitated to landscapes.


Stacey's Cove Twillingate
(click to view)


What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice? 


Thirty years of painting and I am still learning and developing so I guess that has been the process. Hard work, many fails and tears and wanting to go to bed for a week is how I have developed. I found what identifies my work about fifteen years ago when my gallery took me on. I gravitate to light and shadow and time of day. The drama in the scene. 


Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why? 


I always loved Edward Hopper’s paintings and David Blackwood’s lithographs. Hopper’s light always attracted me and Blackwood’s dark and tragic scenes. As I have gotten older there are so many I really admire and find inspiration with. 


Theodore
(click to view)


If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be?


I would have told myself to enjoy the process more. To have fun. 

  

Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle? 


I don’t think I win the distraction and procrastination battle. HA! I have a sign in my studio “Habit is our biggest competitor” I keep that in mind. I spend all of my time in my studio. I may not always produce but I do practice what my mentor friend told me years ago, which is to do at the least an hour every day doing something related to art. I do find walks on the beach helpful for getting me more into the art spirit. 


Stormy Day in Powell's Cove
(click to view)


In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?


I reach out to my family and my artist friends for reassurance at times of doubt. I push forward by being stubborn I guess. To prove to myself I CAN do this. 


What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art? 


My goals are to get my pain under control and produce large bodies of work. I would love to be able to have another show at the gallery with many large pieces. I am always wanting to get better at what I do.


Siblings
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally?


Success for me is producing work that I really love and am proud of. If someone is moved by my work or better yet, wants to buy it, that is fulfilling.

 

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?


It’s hard to say which that is. Winning top prize in the Art’s and Letter’s Awards was special and when the Government procures my work, that always pleases me.


Evening Walk on Freshwater road
(click to view)

Thanks, Laurie!

© 2022 Maddie Marine

Thursday, September 1, 2022

DPW Spotlight Interview: Kim Roberti

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Kim's painting "Salsa" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Kim's DPW Gallery Page: 

Painting is my life! I favor figures/portraits as subjects. I have found rich and endlessly interesting ways to express myself. I continue to paint and learn everyday. The fast-pace and ever-changing commercial landscape of e-commerce opened an unexpected source of revenue for me.

Through my page at Dailypaintworks, I have garnered thousands of collectors from many corners of the world. My work is very affordable and can be easily collected through eBay. I continue to hone my craft on a daily basis and you can visit my art on kimsartblog./blogspot.com.

Salsa
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing interview

What did you want to be growing up?

At 72 now I still don’t want to grow up! What does this really mean? Get a job, go to work, get a paycheck… start over again tomorrow. Nope that’s not for me. I’m still a kid!

When did your artistic journey begin?

I didn’t think of becoming an artist until I turned 50. A dear friend lost her battle with cancer, and we were the same age. This affected me in a profound way. I re-examined my life and decided the dead-end job had to go and I found solace in visiting museums, art galleries and street exhibits. I got to know a few artists and decided that I wanted to paint. I didn’t really know if I could live just being an artist, but it was better than what I was doing. Tired of the cold New England weather I moved to Texas where it was warm, and the living was easier. Eventually, I joined a few local art organizations and found my way into this creative world, once again a child. I got to play with all kinds of mediums and discovered different genres of work.

Out Of The Blue
(click to view)

Did you have any long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?

Not for a long time. I was on fire being a Daily Painters. I put out a large body of work…one to three paintings a day for a decade. When Daily Painters began to lose momentum, I thought I was burned out and even talked of retirement. I just couldn’t do it. I kept my hand in painting and just slowed down a bit. It's easy to get back in the saddle if you never get out!  

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate towards? Which ones don’t appeal?

I love all mediums (remember, still a kid). Oil is my most common go-to because other mediums require a different mind-set, so… it depends on the wishes of the kid. I gravitate towards impressionism but also enjoy portrait, still life and landscape. Not a fan of photo realism.

On The Wild Side
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice?

I’m still listening for my voice. I really enjoy the process of self-discovery. Trying new things, new ideas, new mediums, new styles… It's all part of the process of becoming a painter. Changing this up keeps the kid from getting bored.

Name an artist(s), well known or not, who you admire. Why?

This is the type of question that begs for a long answer. I have been painting for 22 years and many artists have influenced me along the way at one time or another. I still discover and follow new artists today. Sherrie McGraw and David Laffel for the chiaroscuro present in their work. I was fortunate to work with them in their garden for seven years and I learned how great Modern Masters work (picked up a few things in the process). I love Steve Huston’s brushwork and use of color harmony. There’s a real beauty and strength in Steve’s work. I will be forever influenced by Milt Kobayashi. It is so playful with juicy brushwork and luscious colors. Finally, Kim English for his use of back light in his watercolors. Oops, I must include Stephen Scott Young! Oh, and Dean Mitchell! And then there is Sally Strand for pastel. Last, but not least, Carol Marine (a little brown-nosing here). Carol’s artwork is like candy to me and I really find her work charming. Do I sound like an actor accepting an award here! I warned you it would be long. 

Bella
(click to view)

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self – what would that be?

Who says I’m old! I’m still a kid here! Well, I guess it would be to study hard and be patient. There is no magic trick! Learn the principal elements of design; apply them well and be playful. Learn to let go! 

Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle?

The battle is still raging! Daily Painters trained me to work hard every day… small pieces… time to play! You got to let the kid out.

Dream
(click to view)

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

I keep trying. Life is full of hardships, and you need to just keep putting one foot forward.

What are some of your long- and short-term goals for yourself or your art?

My short- and long-term goals are the same…getting up every day and painting! Bob (my husband) will take care of the rest!

Onion and Garlic 
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally?

To live to paint another day.

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

I don’t know if there are any that stand out. I was very proud when I received the Jack Richardson award in pastel. Or, when I was accepted into the Oil Painters of America. Every time I complete a painting, I’m proud indeed.

 Got Milk?  
(click to view)
Thanks, Kim!

© 2022 Maddie Marine

Thursday, August 18, 2022

DPW Spotlight Interview: Brad Bisbey

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Brad's painting "Sunset" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Brad's DPW Gallery Page: 


When I was young, I suffered from several health problems. I couldn't do sports, so I began to draw and paint, and I didn’t stop. I went on to receive a B.A. degree in Art from St. Ambrose University in Davenport, Iowa. Later I studied with renowned portrait painter Daniel Greene in Chicago. I also teach portrait, figure, and landscape painting at Beréskin Gallery in Bettendorf, Iowa. My work is in many private collections around the United States , Canada, and Europe. 

For me, everyone and everything is a potential subject. I try to stay awake to all the possibilities. All art is a search. I realize that what I am painting must first have an emotional impact on me, and then, hopefully, it will touch others as well. My painting is a search for this balance between intellectual and emotional responses to the world around me. I hope to remain endlessly curious.

I live and work in Moline, Illinois, located along the banks of the Mississippi River.

 What did you want to be growing up? 

For as long as I can remember, I was interested in art. I had asthma and couldn’t do sports, so I occupied my time drawing. My mother had a series of art books that caught my interest. From age 9, I really knew I wanted to be an artist, but where that would take me I did not know!
 
When did your artistic journey begin? 

All I really wanted out of high school was out of high school! College was a different ball game and it took a while to find a sense of direction. It was the 1970s after all. Many miles on the brush were required to find my authentic thoughts that eventually found their way into my work. I think my real journey began after studying with Daniel Greene in Chicago in 1992. His teaching resonated with me and really awakened a creative side that I can’t explain. But I am not sure the artistic journey actually has a beginning or an end. It is an ongoing search that encompasses all our experiences.
It is a search that renews itself every day!
 
Deliverance
(click to view)

Did you have any long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?

I did go through a long creative block where I didn’t produce much work and I really thought I was washed up as an artist and it looked as if I would never draw or paint again. Nothing anywhere inspired me to paint! So I didn’t. I just read books on what to do when you can’t paint! That didn’t help. How did I begin painting again? I began painting. And I painted bad paintings. The old saying is, How do you paint good paintings? Answer. Paint lots of bad paintings. So I did. 
Eventually, I was fortunate enough to be accepted into the once Daily Painters.com. And I painted. Now I know I won’t live long enough to paint all the paintings that I want to paint!

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal?

I worked in oil for many years, and then developed a severe allergy to the solvents. That almost put me out of business. I had to find another medium. I worked in watercolor quite a bit, but I like a paint with more body. Acrylics have come a long way since my college days, and now I wouldn’t go back to oil paint even if I could. I love pen and ink and watercolor as well!
I love all subject matter and approach portrait, figure, landscape and still life on an equal playing field. For me, painting isn’t about painting; painting is all about seeing.

Ballet Dancers
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice? 

I was really hung up on my personal style and my personal voice when I was younger. Now when I teach painting I tell my students not to worry about it because it is already built in. It came with them when they were born! It’s like their handwriting. They don’t have to go searching for their handwriting! I can have 12 students all paint the same subject and they end up with 12 completely different paintings. Just paint. And learn the nuts and bolts of good painting. Your voice is in there!

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why? 

My personal list is long! I love Norman Rockwell and have always admired his painting skill and the themes of his work. He was the first artist whose work I couldn’t get enough of. As mentioned earlier, I love Daniel Greene, who was a world class pastel artist and portrait painter and was an incredibly generous teacher. His technique has stuck with me for over 30 years. 
The French Impressionists are favorites for their paintings and for their biographies. 
I am kind of a sponge when it comes to looking at art. If I see a work or even part of a work that I like, I will soak it in.

The Bride

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be? 

Love more! Don’t be so hard on yourself!
 
Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle? 

Have won a few battles! Haven’t won the war!

New Orleans Model
(click to view)

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

I really had some no nonsense teachers. They were hard core about getting things right the first time! That was a lot of pressure for a poor art student and it carried into real life. I overcame this by understanding that maybe I didn’t have to get it right the first time! What if I didn’t get it right the first time? The world actually didn’t come to a screeching halt! I began to lighten up a little bit, and I didn’t look back. Now when I have self doubt, I lighten up a bit! I understand, as Ansel Adams said, ‘The perfect is the enemy of the good!’

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?

I think my goal at this time in my life is examine the parts of my work that appeal to me the most, probably in terms of brushwork and mark making, and incorporate these into future paintings. I have always believed that one grows as an artist by paying close attention to those areas on the canvas that appeal most to the artist, whether they were applied on purpose or by accident, and also by avoiding those marks which appeal least to the artist. It all comes down to being more and more proficient with the brush.

Fields
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally? 

Success to me used to mean being able to paint every day! But now, success to me means being kind, and being more than generous with the grace of God!
 
What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

Creatively speaking, I am most happy with being a Signature Member of the Painters in Casein and Acrylic Society and having work hang in the Salmagundi Club in New York City. 
 And teaching 4 year olds how to paint and having them grab the brush from my hand and say, ‘Let me show you how to do that!’ That has happened several times!


Dancer
(click to view)
Thanks, Brad!

© 2022 Maddie Marine

Thursday, August 4, 2022

DPW Spotlight Interview: Brenda Kay Paintings

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Brenda's painting "Maple en Plein Air" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Brenda's DPW Gallery Page: 

Brenda Kay Paintings, abstract artist painting representational and plein air paintings
•Inspired by and responding to beauty, culture, and my Creator
•Color filled layers of meaning and paint
•Often complex, always thoughtful

With a commercial art degree from UNW St. Paul, I started out in advertising, but have turned my focus to painting full time in my home studio.  I enjoy using my art training and life experience to build strong abstract compositions.  I love walking in the woods, wind-tossed water, coffee and chocolate, and especially my Beloved Husband and two adult kids.

Brenda has been awarded the BoldBrush Award for Abstract, BoldBrush 1st prize for Abstract, and has received several regional art awards. She has been selected to participate in the Hoosier Salon, the SALI National Abstract Art Exhibition, and is a Hoosier Woman Artist. She was also juried in to a workshop with renowned artist Makoto Fujimura in 2018.
Member: Fort Wayne Artists Guild •Hoosier Salon • Lakeland Art Association• Hoosier Woman Artist

Maple en Plein Air
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing interview

What did you want to be growing up?  

Well, the first thing I remember wanting to be was a cowboy, and when I realized that girls could only be cowGIRLS, I was severely disappointed!
I really could not decide what I wanted to be, but when I was entering my second year of college with an undecided major, my Dad said, "You know, you will always be drawing. Why don't you study [commercial] art so that you have a way to earn a living, and then if you still want more school, you can go back and get more." The better I get to know artists, the more I recognize how unusual that parental direction was! And he was sure right.
 
When did your artistic journey begin?  

I was the kid in elementary school that was often picked to do the art stuff, like painting Christmas scenes on the windows and 'fixing' the out-of-proportion US map.  Maybe that was the start of the journey.
 
Good Morning!
(click to view)

Did you have any long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?

I did. I set aside my art for many years while we raised and homeschooled our (now adult) kids. We had just been through traumatic times and my health was compromised during that time, so we decided to put first things first. I did still dabble with some art here and there, but it was not until our kids were on their own that I really started to refocus on my art.

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal?

I love acrylics, and my primary artistic calling is abstract painting! I really delight in expressing concepts in non-objective art.
Plein air and somewhat representational painting is my new side pursuit, and I am finding a lot of joy in learning and getting more skillful in these genres. Daily Paintworks is a great place for me to share these paintings.
I have difficulty appreciating photo-realism/realism in painting.

Pasture Grazing en Plein Air
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice?  

Interestingly, I had always done representational art until dear friends commissioned me to do a large abstract painting for their home. I didn't even know where to begin to paint a quality work of art that was non-objective, so I began to study and practice abstract works until I found my abstract painting becoming second nature, and I found that I could communicate effectively with that genre.
Now I am in the process of studying and practicing more representational art and plein air painting and I am finding that I don't yet have that inner direction that comes almost naturally in these genres. Particularly in plein air painting, I am finding so many factors that require my attention that I struggle to find my stride! But I am feeling it coming along as I practice.  

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why?  

There are so, so many! Fred Ingrams, for simplicity in design and excitement in color
Jim Wodark, for plein air chops and interesting color
Bob Burridge for teaching skillfully and compelling color
David Huang, metalsmith, for detail and brilliance in his vessels
Timothy Botts, calligraphy, meaningful design and lots of color
And also lots of poets, musicians, dancers, actors, authors, and other artists

Swimmer Warm-up
(click to view)

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be?  

I still need to tell the same things to myself now - don't get too uptight about the results. Do the next right thing, and keep at it, and let the results be left up to God's timing. Just don't give up.
 
Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle?  

Whew, this is a tough question! I do find it is helpful to get SOMETHING on the substrate, and then respond to what is there. It helps me to remember that, as I heard from artist Kathie Odom, "While I am painting, nothing hurts!" Ha ha!
 
Walk By Faith
(click to view)

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

Another tough question! I find that my first response has to be to ask my Heavenly Father whether I am following His lead. More than anything, I want to be doing what He calls me to. So sometimes He will prompt someone to send me an encouraging note (or an invitation to be a featured DPW artist!), or maybe I will win an award or sell a painting. Sometimes I just begin to feel more confident by doing the next thing as a matter of discipline. And sometimes I just have to choose to paint as a discipline even if I don't feel better!

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?

I really don't have goals. I know that is not the way I am "supposed to" answer, but it is the truth. I would love to be able to paint when my Beloved Husband retires, and help support our family if possible, but I wouldn't call it a goal.

Dandelions
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally?  

I have asked myself this question before, and my best answer is that I want my art to communicate - to bring truth, goodness, and beauty into the world in a way that helps people see that God is True, Good, and Beautiful, and that He is extremely fond of us! It is a very tall order for paintings to do that, admittedly!
 
What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

There have been significant moments in my artistic journey, including awards, invitations to juried exhibitions and events, and good sales of my work, but at least today as I type this, I think one of the "proudest" moments for me was seeing the impact of one of my paintings on someone. Most years I host an open studio/open house in my home, and I invite as many people as I can get my hands on to come and see my new work! One particular year, I saw a lady in my studio gazing at an abstract work that was on my easel. It was a very meaningful work to me, but I was not yet sure that it was communicating like I wanted it to. But there she stood, weeping in front of that painting. She asked me about the meaning of it, and yes, she had indeed been impacted in the way that I had hoped. Not much can top that. 

DeFries Garden en Plein Air
(click to view)


Thanks, Brenda!

© 2022 Maddie Marine