Thursday, January 14, 2021

DPW Spotlight Interview: Ans Debije

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Ans's painting "Witzig" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Ans's DPW Gallery Page:

18th of Januari 2020

I am proud to say that I have won the third prize with my painting ‘Starring’ in the 'Painting of the year 2019' competition. It is absolutely fantastic that my paintings were immediately sold during the opening of the exhibition at Kunstzaal van Heijningen in The Hague (the Netherlands)! 

The jury's judgment is as follows:

A great work in its expression despite the small size. A daring classic and therefore timeless work. The background is perfect in its simplicity and the limited space is optimally utilized. From a distance it is a very photorealistic work with a fantastic material expression and up close it is an almost modern and expressionist work with large brush strokes. The painting is painted ton sur ton with a limited palette and consists of only exciting parts.

(click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

From an early age I have loved drawing and painting. On my fifteenth birthday I got a set of oil paint and I started a short course in oil painting. The teacher must have been a fan of Dali because the works I have left from that time all have something surrealistic about them.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

After high school I was accepted at the Art Academy in Rotterdam, but also at the Design Academy in Eindhoven. I had to choose and chose the latter. I don't regret it, but it did mean that the freedom of painting was considerably limited by the fact that what you create had to be applicable to the consumer market. I chose to design interior and fashion fabrics.

Witzig
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Ans's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

Over the years I have tried many techniques and mediums. Watercolor, ink, mixed media and printing techniques such as monotype and drypoint etching. I wanted to make larger works and therefore started painting with acrylic on large canvases. I also used multiple mediums on those large canvases such as modeling paste, sand, pieces of patterned fashion fabrics, acrylic and oil paint to create textures. At that time I used the oil paint very diluted with a painting medium to let it run as a transparent layer over parts of the painting.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

At the moment I only paint with oil paint on a small sized panel (up to 12 x 16 inch).

Unadorned
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

The development towards new techniques is gradual and sometimes occurs 'by accident'. The thought of having to radically renew my style or technique from one moment to the next paralyzes me. I had one of my small paintings (Nikka whisky from the barrel) enlarged to 75 x 55 inches, printed in 3D on Dibond (aluminum). It's impressive! I would like to try in the future if it is possible to paint it directly in that size and with the same look as the little ones. A challenge, I don't have the strength, the space and money for it right now.

Who or what inspires you most?

I lost my job about two years ago. All of a sudden I had time to paint more often. I was already working on still lifes but wanted to paint more loosely. During a search on the internet a painting by Carol Marine came across. Her story about daily painting immediately appealed to me. No more staring at a large blank canvas for weeks, but just making a tiny painting every day, yay!

I try to make an impression of the object with as few brushstrokes as possible. Sarah Sedwick's tutorials on Stroke Economy are very helpful. So many good artists from past and present are an inspiration to me.

White balsamico
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

Sometimes, to postpone painting, I would go to thrift stores in search of small utensils with a quaint look. Now that all stores are frequently closed due to the Corona lockdown, I don't get out very often. So no procrastination, but work with what I can find around the house. I now know that you don't need to have any special things. The way you paint something makes it special.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I still get up every morning with the happy thought that I can paint another day!

Nikka whisky from the barrel
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I almost always have still life as a subject. For me it is important that the light does something special with the object that I want to paint. I spend a lot of time setting up and lighting a still life.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I enjoy looking at the work of others. At the moment mainly via social media and the internet. I look forward to the time when the museums can reopen. Together with my three painter friends we are a group that meets twice a month. Sometimes we paint and sometimes we chat all evening. I have to admit that I don't get outside enough at the moment. I think it's a joy to play a round of golf. That is actually the only time that I am outside in nature. Something completely different from painting. I should do that more often.

Up close
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I have to learn not to be too critical of myself and my work. Easier said than done.

What makes you happiest about your art?

It's great that my art is increasingly appreciated and bought by people all over the world. I paint with great pleasure and it is nice to know that people enjoy it!

Grape Escape
(click to view)

Thanks, Ans!

© 2021 Sophie Marine

Thursday, January 7, 2021

DPW Spotlight Interview: Stephanie Penman

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Stephanie's painting "Just For You" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Stephanie's DPW Gallery Page:

Most women shop for shoes or clothing, I buy art supplies. I am happiest when I am creating, painting, making jewelry, sewing or even hammering nails into boards. My father was a commercial artist, so I grew up with art supplies at my fingertips. To this day my “go to” cutting tool is a razor blade and if I’m gluing something together it probably will involve rubber cement. My father’s paintings line every wall of my parent’s home (and a few of mine). I am in awe of each and every one. I photograph small sections of them and try to copy and learn from them. When my dad’s eyesight made it too difficult for him to paint, he offered me his acrylics and oil paints as well of any of his brushes – I took them home determined to find that talent hidden somewhere in me. That was early 2014, since then I have been waking up every morning to the inspirational artists of DPW, and dabbling in my basement studio as much as possible.  It is time to stop WATCHING, and start DOING!! So here goes nothing!

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I truly cannot pin point a single event or time when I started painting. I learned about DPW probably through Pinterest and was intrigued. I bought Carol’s book Daily Painting and was inspired. Because I was working it was difficult to carve out time to paint every day, but fortunately I am a morning person, so I started using that time for painting and experimenting. My father was a commercial artist who worked out of a studio in our house. He was the original Mr. Mom working from home and taking care of four kids while my mom worked as a nurse. We always had markers, paint, rubber cement and canvases to play with, but none of us followed in his footsteps. Actually until I started painting myself, I never fully appreciated his amazing talent, which is sad. Now I wish he were here to guide me and answer questions, sometimes I think he is doing just that, only remotely.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I love crafting and making art. If anything, I have probably dabbled in too many mediums. I have never met an art supply I didn’t like… as is evident by my studio area. I make jewelry, even have taken classes in the lost art of wax casting. Lately I have been experimenting with collage, making my own painted Yupo paper. I have taken a classes in printmaking and really love Linoleum Block carving - may try to add that to my “to do” list this year.

Just For You
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Stephanie's interview.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

I mostly work in acrylics, they are way more forgiving. I want to spend more time experimenting in oil, but I always manage to make excuses like “maybe next week” or “after I get back from my next trip.” I don’t know why but they seem like such a big commitment with mediums and solvents and clean-up. I think I just need to sign-up for an Oil Painting for Beginners class and just dive in.

Which ideas are you looking forward to exploring?

Maybe trying to work more with a limited palette and get more comfortable with color mixing. Master flesh tones and paint more people. Also, fluid acrylics, they are so vibrant – I want to work them into my process.

Hanging Out
(click to view)

Who or what inspires you most?

I love nature and the Southwest. Hummingbirds and cactus fascinate me. The Grand Canyon and Sedona are magical.

All the other artists on DPW inspire me to keep going and put in the time. It took me probably three years to get up enough courage to join DPW and I posted my 62nd painting the other day. I don’t want to tell you how many are in the basement in the “to be burned” pile.

A trip to an art museum or gallery can always inspire me, or a nice long hike.

What does procrastination look like for you?

Spending time scrolling through social media sites, looking at other people’s art, photographs on sites like Pixabay and PaintMyPhoto looking for inspiration. Full blown procrastination usually results in me going to TJ Maxx or Target.

Summer Fun
(click to view)

What has helped you to grow as an artist?

People that support and encourage me. I can always count on my sister to be an objective critic. She and I have been carving out time to paint together which is difficult because we live over 1000 miles apart, but we have had many Sister Paintalongs that have been very productive. Sometimes we paint from the same reference photo and the results are so different, I just love that.

I think workshops are great because you get to try things from a different artist’s perspective and it is a forced chunk of time just to work on art. Covid has put a damper on this, but hopefully soon we can return to some semblance of normalcy.

I love studying other artists that I admire, their brushstrokes, color palette, background, etc. I am so thankful to artists who share their knowledge on social media, with videos or progress photos.

Listening to art podcasts also helps my growth. Learn to Paint with Kelly Ann Powers and Studio Insider – Susan Nethercote are my go-to's.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?  

I started using a planner about a year and a half ago and it has been a game changer. I write in everything I want to get done that day with a little box next to it. I may be a bit over the top about this, I even include nine boxes that are for my seventy-two oz of water that I try to drink. The satisfaction I get when I check those boxes keeps me going. I think it makes me feel somewhat in control of my life.

I mark out time just to plan art… like, “come up with three reference photos” or “photograph still lifes of XYZ.”

Intense Stare
(click to view)

What is your biggest challenge as a professional artist?

Becoming one. Finding my style. My father was a very realistic painter and I tend to gravitate to that even though I would like to paint “looser.”

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

This year I am signed up for two online fifty-two week courses. One is more “art play” and the other is Miniature Workshop by Jed Dorsey – I love his use of light and shadows. I am hoping these will push me creatively.

Also, if I’m not feeling like painting, I don’t force it. Sometimes not painting and doing something else, like reading a magazine or taking a walk is all I need to send me running back to the easel. I trip to Dick Blick or Michael’s can help too.

Untitled
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I am learning to be patient with myself and if it isn’t working take a break, don’t force it. Keep going!

What makes you happiest about your art?

Turning on the music and losing myself. Time flies in the studio (aka basement).

I love the connection my art has with my dad (who passed away last year) and my sister.

Wonderful Weeds
(click to view)

Thanks, Stephanie!

© 2021 Sophie Marine

Thursday, December 31, 2020

DPW Spotlight Interview: Lisa Grizaniuk

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Lisa's painting "All Set" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Lisa's DPW Gallery Page:

Lisa has been painting since a young age and knew very early in life that she simply had to be creative. She often works in acrylic but works in several different painting media as she was classically trained. 

Welcoming commissions, she enjoys working with those who want to have a work for their home or office and walking them through the process of a commission, large or small.

instagram @bancroftandtheorchard

All Set
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Lisa's interview.

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I first started painting as a grade school student in a Saturday morning drop in class that I was able to attend with a good friend. I had taken lots of classes as a child, I grew up in a city that has a world renown museum and spent a lot of time inside.

The gentleman who ran the program didn’t even think twice about handing acrylic paint to someone who very well may waste it. He addressed me with a confidence in me that I had talent. It made me feel like I was on cloud nine. I was a kid. Too young to even babysit. He worked with me and spoke to me as if I was an equal. It made me think I stood a chance.

Peonies
(click to view)

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

My stops and starts were life changes: It would not have mattered what my career was, it would have hit a pause. But as all parents know, totally worth it. The other times I had a rough time were times I wasn’t selling a lot of art and galleries were struggling. A recession is a recession and people can’t buy art when they can’t pay rent or a mortgage. It’s tough to stay positive when nothing is selling. Especially for months at a time. But...

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I love to paint, I paint in oil, acrylic, and watercolor. I appreciate my traditional art education but have found acrylic works well for me. I’m mesmerized by color. Totally mind blown.

English Teacups
(click to view)

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

I’m all over the place for genre, florals are definitely enjoyable as I like to garden myself. There’s something about painting a tomato that centers me and I think it offers many challenges that aren’t always apparent at first glance. I love cadmium red. It’s a go to for me.

Who or what inspires you most?

Some inspiration may come from a bunch of flowers from my yard (or the market) but can also pop up looking at a field with a barn that’s screaming to be painted. It’s a combination of color, texture and light. I just never know when something will click. But when it clicks, it clicks and good music is a must. The creative process cannot begin in me without it.

Teacups and Berries
(click to view)

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Making time for art isn’t easy but certainly denotes a rhythm for me that cannot be replaced by anything else. Flowers cannot grow without water and for me it is a similar feeling. I have to be creative, it’s like breathing. It gets easier as children get older but it needs to be a time carved out each day. Something is better than nothing. Beggars can’t be choosers.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

There are times everyone has burnout or needs a recharge. At times I’ve done workshops, taught classes myself, or just found another outlet to be creative to find a new inspiration. It always works out.

One of the ways I stay fresh is to pay attention to what I see as repetitive, both in myself and other artists. Some repeats are good and some are just the same mistakes. I like to shake it up.

English Arrangement
(click to view)

What makes you happiest about your art?

What makes me happiest about my art is that I’m able to do it. I’m grateful God gave me talent, I’m grateful I’m married to my husband who supports my art, and I’m grateful that I am able to paint when I have the time each day. There are a lot of talented people who have to do something more reliable for income because their kids need to eat. Talent is just the first step. It’s like anything else, one has to practice to improve. But that’s not as easy to facilitate for some as it is for others. Don’t think a single brush hits any paint without that thought going through my head. I’m very aware that I am blessed, and I consider the time I make art to be a form of prayer.

Thanks, Lisa!

© 2020 Sophie Marine

Friday, December 18, 2020

DPW Spotlight Interview: Ute Gil

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Ute's painting "Chickadee" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Ute's DPW Gallery Page:

My goal is to create paintings that show my love of nature and animals while capturing the emotion of my subjects. I consciously reduce details, keeping my brushstrokes loose and impressionistic, allowing the viewer a more personal interpretation of the image. It is more important to me that a painting is compelling rather than true to reality. Much of my inspiration comes from the rural areas that I visit in Western Loudoun County, VA as well as my travels to other countries. The paintings are created both plein air and in my studio. Lately I have been experimenting with abstract backgrounds combined with realistic subjects. My hope is that you will enjoy my paintings as much as I did creating them. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

Growing up in Germany, I took my first art classes as a teenager learning traditional folk painting and later silk painting. In my early twenties I moved to Spain where I was introduced to oil and pastel. I met my husband during that time and we moved to the US three years later. I took a long break from painting while raising two kids. In 2003 I started taking art classes again and haven’t stop painting ever since.



What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I am experienced with acrylic, pastel, silk painting, watercolor and oil. By taking art classes from different teachers, I was introduced to all subject matters and came to realize that animals and birds interest me the most, even though they are quite challenging.

Chickadee
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Ute's interview.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Oil is my favorite medium because of its textural qualities. Since my husband retired and we started to travel more, I was looking for a medium that is travel friendly. I’m painting now in watercolor as well and might offer them for sale sometime next year.



Which ideas are you looking forward to exploring?

I’m planning on introducing figure into my landscape. Many times, the reason why I paint something in the first place is the subject itself but I spend lots of time thinking about how to express it on the canvas. I’m very interested in combining abstract, impressionistic backgrounds with realistic subjects and finding ways to simplify complex references.

Butterfly
(click to view)

Who or what inspires you most?

I get inspired by my world around me. A color pattern on a sweater, a new color paint tube, travel to a new place. Inspiration is everywhere. I then start exploring which painting technique would best produce the desired effect.



What does procrastination look like for you?

Procrastination happens when I’m worried about the outcome of a painting. I’ve learned to trust my abilities and enjoy the painting process. I accept that not all paintings are going to be master pieces and that the worst thing that can happen is that I have to scrape the canvas again. But even a failed painting has something to teach. I’m so much more relaxed these days and give myself permission to explore new techniques and new art tools. This is usually when all the magic happens, exactly when I’m not worried about having something to show at the end of the day.

Meadow
(click to view)

What has helped you to grow as an artist?

I started to paint small in order to accelerate the learning curve. Small allows me to experiment, to not worry about the result since the time invested in a painting is so much less than a large one. Another way to grow is painting in series. This allowed me to get familiar with the subject at an even deeper level and then play with the subtleties of each painting.



What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

With painting it’s the same as with going to the gym. You just have to show up even though you might not feel like it at the time. I know that there is never the perfect time to paint, there is always some work in the household waiting for me. I make it a priority to paint every day, even if it is only for an hour. 

Sheep
(click to view)

What is your biggest challenge as a professional artist?

My biggest challenges are the non-painting activities like maintaining a website and social media presence, writing monthly newsletters and taking and editing photos of the paintings. This seems to take up half of my time and keeping up with the ever-changing technology can be daunting. To have a great support group of other artists who have done this is essential in getting it all done and not feeling overwhelmed.



How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

To keep my art “fresh”, I learned that it is vital to paint what interests me, not what I think would sell. I keep true to myself and do not worry if anybody will like my painting.



Chickadee
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

2020 has been a challenging year and we artists have to be creative in how we market our paintings in this ever-changing environment. Unfortunately, it’s not only about having beautiful art, it’s also about how to connect with the collector. I used to know all my collectors personally and now have to learn to navigate the online market. I was surprised to have received some very sweet messages from happy buyers and learned that even selling online can be personal, just in a different way.



What makes you happiest about your art?

The creation process can be like meditation. I lose track of time and can disconnect from everything around me. Many of my sales are to local collectors and some have become friends. And the happiness is complete when I know that the painting found a new home where it is being loved.

Zinnias
(click to view)

Thanks, Ute!

© 2020 Sophie Marine

Thursday, December 10, 2020

DPW Spotlight Interview: Inge Peeze

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Inge's painting "Spidershaped" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

Biography

Inge Peeze grew up in the Netherlands and lives with her husband in Bilthoven. After studying Pedagogy, she worked in education for a number of years. She then switched to a completely different field and started providing product innovation for large multinationals. Seven years ago she made another switch and became a full time artist. She has since graduated in Painting at the Classical Art Academy in Groningen. Inge has a studio in Bilthoven and also works as a drawing and painting teacher.

Artist’s Statement

ART RELIES ON BOTH CREATIVITY AND SKILLS

In my view, a good painter is someone who can not only think conceptually and creatively, but also has an excellent command of techniques and the skills to give shape to his / her ideas. I am happy that there is a comeback of classic craftsmanship right now!

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

In my youth I was always drawing and I got a lot of positive reactions. My creative side, however, was not very stimulated from home. When I wanted to go to art school at the end of my secondary school, my parents did not approve of this. In their eyes, becoming an artist was not a profession where you could earn a living. So I chose a different education. After that my attention to drawing faded into the background. Unfortunately, I didn't know anyone around me who was involved with it. It wasn't until much later that I met a colleague who made me enthusiastic about painting. I took a course and soon many more followed. The passion for painting was born!

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

Since I discovered oil painting my drive has never diminished. I have been painting almost daily for years now, with the exception of weekends.

Spidershaped
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Inge's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

At the art school in Groningen we were offered many different techniques to experiment with: charcoal, pastels, acrylic, tempera and oil paint.

Which ones have “stuck” and which ones have fallen away?

Painting with oil suits me best and I have specialized in that in recent years.

Swimming Eggs
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

In the future I would like to work with mixed painting techniques and experiment with it.

Who or what inspires you most?

I recently started with daily paintings to experiment with color and composition. I like to work with strong color contrasts and interesting flat compositions. Still life gives you the most possibilities in that respect. Daily painters like Carol Marine have inspired me to get started with this. I also look a lot at artists who, in addition to using solid color contrasts, abstract strongly as well. Such as Wayne Thibaud, Georgio Morandi, Raymond Strapans and Ean Uglow.

In addition, I have been interested in magical realism for a long time. Especially artists such as Edward Hopper and his followers such as John Register, David Hockney, Quint Buchholtz etc. During my studies I have already been working in this direction and I also have plans to continue with this. My magically realistic work cannot be found on my DPW website, I have another website for that.

Sugar Bowl
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

I find that I have to find a balance between the time I want to invest in daily paintings and the magically realistic work that takes me much longer. It is difficult to let this go together. I have now chosen to make daily paintings exclusively for a while, so that I can fully focus on this and therefore make steps faster.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for art?

I work very disciplined. I paint on fixed days and hours in my studio. If I have little inspiration, which has not happened much, I will just skip a day. I also notice that it is good to insert a period of “vacation” every now and then, to free your mind from everything.

Purple Flowers
(click to view)

How do generally arrive ideas for your paintings?

My inspiration usually comes from looking at work by other artists. So many museum visits, watching YouTube videos, visiting exhibitions and reading books about art. I have a large collection of art books, both art historical and art techniques. I also collect a lot of art images on Pinterest.

How do you keep art “fresh”. What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I have a broad interest, which does not end with certain artists or just a favorite art movement. So I let myself be inspired from a different angle every time.

Orange Slices
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning right now as an artist?

In the past year I have mainly studied color theories, such as that of Johannes Itten, and I always try to apply new color combinations and effects in my work.

What makes you happiest about your art?

Knowing that there are many people who appreciate your art and find it worthwhile to give it a nice place in their home.

Let's Go Bananas 2
(click to view)

Thanks, Inge!

© 2020 Sophie Marine

Friday, December 4, 2020

DPW Spotlight Interview: Elizabeth Blanchard

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Elizabeth's painting "Behind St. John's Church" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Elizabeth's DPW Gallery Page:

I am a native and current resident of the Tidewater area of Virginia (now referred to as Hampton Roads). I still get to visit the home where I grew up in Portsmouth where my parents still live. My growing up years on the Elizabeth River, family boat trips up the Chesapeake Bay, summers of crabbing and fishing on the pier, and later trips to the Outer Banks of NC have influenced my bent toward anything water. (click to read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

In 2011 I found myself a stressed out homeschool mom of three. I needed something outside of kids and home, so I tried to remember what I did before marriage and kids. Art! I used to love art, so I called my friend to sign up with me for a six week oil painting class. That session turned into another and another while I started teaching art at our homeschool co-op, which led to teaching K-12 at a school, which then transitioned to teaching privately. I am back to homeschooling and back as the teacher in the oil painting class that started it all.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I had a twelve year break after my college years until I started painting again in 2011.

Behind Saint John's Church
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Elizabeth's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I have tried just about everything from wire sculptures to pyrography, to printing, to clay, to collage, to packing tape body sculptures, among many other projects in preparation to teach art. Teaching kids is a great way to get out of a rut, out of your comfort zone, and to appreciate styles you never would try for yourself. Apart from teaching, I have tried watercolors, gouache, acrylics, pastels, and pencil.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

I find it difficult to work on watercolors and oils simultaneously, so I rarely use watercolors anymore.  Pastels and acrylics are also on the back burner right now.

The Cow Painting
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

Gouache is a medium I’d really like to work on and learn how to use well. Also I need to get my 16 year old daughter to teach me how to paint digitally.

Who or what inspires you most?

The most powerful and meaningful source of inspiration is my Lord, Savior, and Friend Jesus Christ.  I see Him in the beauty, order, and unpredictability of creation. Painting is my way of worship and meditation. If I have something in my ear while I’m painting, it will be worship music of some kind. Secondly, I find help, inspiration, and instruction from contemporary artists, whether online or local. I learn so much from fellow artists.

Quilted Light
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

It looks like homeschooling, potty training, dirty laundry, dishes, cooking, driving someone somewhere, or playing word games on my phone. It’s not hard to find an excuse to put off working on that painting.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art? 

Teaching my weekly oil painting class forces me to keep painting, thinking about painting, get out of the house, be with other artists, and keep pushing myself to learn more in order to teach others.

Boogie Boarding
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I go outside.  I try to paint local and the things and places I know. I rarely paint anything I haven’t seen or experienced first hand.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

Burnout happens to me when I push too hard for a finished product. I have to be ok with failing, with taking my time, and not thinking about the deadline. I go back to focusing on it being an act of worship.  I do think that those times when nothing is working and I can’t put out a decent painting, are the times I’m doing to most growing as an artist. Those seasons are productive in unseen ways.

Crab on a Plate
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

There are so many things to learn! I think I'm figuring out better what kind of painter I want to be and narrowing down my style. What is important and what isn’t. I’m learning to be more worshipful.

What makes you happiest about your art?

Every painting is an accomplishment.

Windsor-B
(click to view)

Thanks, Elizabeth!

© 2020 Sophie Marine

Thursday, November 26, 2020

DPW Spotlight Interview: Priscilla Olson

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Priscilla's painting "Morning Light" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Priscilla's DPW Gallery Page:

Biography

Priscilla Olson grew up in Midland, Michigan, but spent her professional life in the Chicago area as a commercial animator and plein air painter.  Since returning to Midland in 2011, she has been participating in painting evets around the state, exhibiting, selling and receiving awards for her work.  Priscilla continues to be an active plein air painter and enjoys sharing and promoting this activity throughout the Great Lakes Bay Region.

Artist's Statement

I like wondering - not so much knowing - about the subject.  It is curiosity that compels me to choose my themes.  My paintings represent the feeling of anticipation and mystery that the subject evokes in me.  I enjoy viewing art that poses open questions.  My goal is to create work that invites you to imagine.

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting:

As a little girl, I got lots of encouragement and praise for my drawings and paintings, so I kept at it!  I’ve always been involved in making art, in one way or another, but it wasn’t until I became a professional animator that I really learned to draw competently.  My real preference is for painting, and I started developing my skills in that medium while working professionally as an animator.  While I loved and valued the experience of working as part of a team (in animation) I have come to enjoy the solitary activity of painting.

Morning Light
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Priscilla's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

Not really.  I started to dedicate my off-work hours to painting and drawing early on, when I started in the animation industry, and, now that I’ve left that profession, I get to paint more!

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

In the animation industry, I worked with all sorts of media: modeling clays for stop motion, and a variety of drawing media for the less conventional spots that we did (before digital).

I enjoy sculpting as an exercise for understanding form.  I’ve painted in watercolor, acrylic, oil and pastel.  I can’t take pastel, because putting it to paper gives me the same feeling as when I start to bite into a peach.  I can hardly stand the texture!  My favored medium is oil paint.  I like painting people in an environment, but not so much portraits.  I like painting still lifes, but mostly for practice.  Landscape is where it’s at, for me.

Tucked Away
(click to view)

Which ones have “stuck” and which ones have fallen away?

Oil paint is by far my favorite.  I concentrate on this medium, and try not to get enchanted by other media.  There is already so very much to learn!  I have done a fair amount of research into making the particular kind of surface I want, and right now I’m in a place where I’m just concentrating on the content and technique of making compelling and interesting images.

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I’m interested in doing more figurative work at some point. In oil paint.

Bird's Eye View
(click to view)

Who or what inspires you most?

All of nature, mainly.  But, in addition, I spark to the writings of John Ruskin, John Carlton, Harold Speed, and several others from long ago.

I also get much inspiration from studying the landscape drawings of the Renaissance Dutch masters and others.  I have found good reference from old museum catalogs in used book shops and, now, online.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

I try to keep my mornings untouched by any other concerns.

At Grandpa Tiny's #2
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I paint outside frequently.  I decide on a destination, then go there to paint.  Sometimes it’s difficult to find a view that sparks my imagination, but that’s just part of it.  So I’ll focus on a spot that may not interest me, just to get going. The challenge then becomes how to make the scene work on canvas.  Other times, it seems like the painting just appears in stages as I look on!

How do you keep art “fresh”. What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I stay interested by reading, doing exercises, sometimes copying a small part of someone’s painting that I admire in an attempt to find out what it is like to make this stroke, mix that color, etc.

I do studies, where the commitment is less, but the likelihood of understanding something new is greater.

Local Color
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I’m currently learning what’s been studied regarding the genesis of art by early hominids.

What makes you happiest about your art?

Painting when I know I’m going in the right direction.  And to have a painting that I did resonate with a collector!

Violet and Lily
(click to view)

Thanks, Priscilla!

© 2020 Sophie Marine

Thursday, November 19, 2020

DPW Spotlight Interview: Samira Yanushkova

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Samira's painting "Still life onion with frame" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Samira's DPW Gallery Page:

I am watercolor artist
I want to share the news. I won the international competition the "Golden Brush" in Turkey 2020. More info here 

Exhibitions:
2018 🇺🇦IWS Ukraine, international Watercolor Exhibition
2018 🇨🇿IWS Czech Republic
2019 🇲🇲Myanmar 1st International Watercolor Art Festival Myanmar “Peaceful Golden Heritage 2019”
2019 🇻🇳 Vietnam Cambodia "3ª International Watercolor Biennale 2019 “Watercolor & Peace”
2019 🇷🇴Romania Bucharest IWS Romania 1st International Watercolor Festival
2019 🇮🇹Italia Fabriano
2019 🇮🇹Italia UrbinoInAcquerello

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I was born into a family of artists, so my toys were pencils and paints. I have been drawing since early childhood. During my school years, I helped my parents do their art work: I painted portraits in oils, drew cartoons, and developed street advertising.

Still life onion with frame
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Samira's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career? 

There was a short stop after the baby was born.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

Yes, I tried to work in different techniques and genres: Sculpture, ceramics, stained glass, engraving, cartoons, glass engraving, oil, illustration, abstraction.

Meeting place
(click to view)

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Realism, watercolor, drawing. They have disappeared at the moment: oil, sculpture, but I am still interested in these materials.

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

Oil, sculpture.

Onions in a cauldron original watercolor painting
(click to view)

Who or what inspires you most?

Inspired by sunlight on objects and faces, inspired by nature combined with watercolors.

What does procrastination look like for you?

In my case, this is perfectionism. I want to do the job perfectly and I'm afraid to ruin it. My husband inspires and supports me and gives me confidence, so this condition rarely occurs.

Cityscape watercolor original painting
(click to view)

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

A clean workplace, new art materials, exhibitions, ideas in my head make me go to the studio and draw.

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

Being in nature, at the sea, in the garden, I look at the forms, follow the light and imagine how it can be depicted in watercolors, make sketches, ask questions and try to find the answer.

Landscape of Forester's House
(click to view)

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

Freshness of art "Positive!" I enjoy simple things like a child. I try to see only advantages in everything. I love the sun and rain alike. I have a very cheerful family, she makes me smile and see the world in bright colors. With my creativity, I want to tell the world that it is beautiful.

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

Myself, trying to understand who I am and why I am here.

Metal Milk Can original watercolor painting
(click to view)

What makes you happiest about your art?

A viewer who experiences what I wanted to convey in the picture.

Thanks, Samira!

© 2020 Sophie Marine