Thursday, August 4, 2022

DPW Spotlight Interview: Brenda Kay Paintings

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Brenda's painting "Maple en Plein Air" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Brenda's DPW Gallery Page: 

Brenda Kay Paintings, abstract artist painting representational and plein air paintings
•Inspired by and responding to beauty, culture, and my Creator
•Color filled layers of meaning and paint
•Often complex, always thoughtful

With a commercial art degree from UNW St. Paul, I started out in advertising, but have turned my focus to painting full time in my home studio.  I enjoy using my art training and life experience to build strong abstract compositions.  I love walking in the woods, wind-tossed water, coffee and chocolate, and especially my Beloved Husband and two adult kids.

Brenda has been awarded the BoldBrush Award for Abstract, BoldBrush 1st prize for Abstract, and has received several regional art awards. She has been selected to participate in the Hoosier Salon, the SALI National Abstract Art Exhibition, and is a Hoosier Woman Artist. She was also juried in to a workshop with renowned artist Makoto Fujimura in 2018.
Member: Fort Wayne Artists Guild •Hoosier Salon • Lakeland Art Association• Hoosier Woman Artist

Maple en Plein Air
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing interview

What did you want to be growing up?  

Well, the first thing I remember wanting to be was a cowboy, and when I realized that girls could only be cowGIRLS, I was severely disappointed!
I really could not decide what I wanted to be, but when I was entering my second year of college with an undecided major, my Dad said, "You know, you will always be drawing. Why don't you study [commercial] art so that you have a way to earn a living, and then if you still want more school, you can go back and get more." The better I get to know artists, the more I recognize how unusual that parental direction was! And he was sure right.
 
When did your artistic journey begin?  

I was the kid in elementary school that was often picked to do the art stuff, like painting Christmas scenes on the windows and 'fixing' the out-of-proportion US map.  Maybe that was the start of the journey.
 
Good Morning!
(click to view)

Did you have any long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?

I did. I set aside my art for many years while we raised and homeschooled our (now adult) kids. We had just been through traumatic times and my health was compromised during that time, so we decided to put first things first. I did still dabble with some art here and there, but it was not until our kids were on their own that I really started to refocus on my art.

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal?

I love acrylics, and my primary artistic calling is abstract painting! I really delight in expressing concepts in non-objective art.
Plein air and somewhat representational painting is my new side pursuit, and I am finding a lot of joy in learning and getting more skillful in these genres. Daily Paintworks is a great place for me to share these paintings.
I have difficulty appreciating photo-realism/realism in painting.

Pasture Grazing en Plein Air
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice?  

Interestingly, I had always done representational art until dear friends commissioned me to do a large abstract painting for their home. I didn't even know where to begin to paint a quality work of art that was non-objective, so I began to study and practice abstract works until I found my abstract painting becoming second nature, and I found that I could communicate effectively with that genre.
Now I am in the process of studying and practicing more representational art and plein air painting and I am finding that I don't yet have that inner direction that comes almost naturally in these genres. Particularly in plein air painting, I am finding so many factors that require my attention that I struggle to find my stride! But I am feeling it coming along as I practice.  

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why?  

There are so, so many! Fred Ingrams, for simplicity in design and excitement in color
Jim Wodark, for plein air chops and interesting color
Bob Burridge for teaching skillfully and compelling color
David Huang, metalsmith, for detail and brilliance in his vessels
Timothy Botts, calligraphy, meaningful design and lots of color
And also lots of poets, musicians, dancers, actors, authors, and other artists

Swimmer Warm-up
(click to view)

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be?  

I still need to tell the same things to myself now - don't get too uptight about the results. Do the next right thing, and keep at it, and let the results be left up to God's timing. Just don't give up.
 
Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle?  

Whew, this is a tough question! I do find it is helpful to get SOMETHING on the substrate, and then respond to what is there. It helps me to remember that, as I heard from artist Kathie Odom, "While I am painting, nothing hurts!" Ha ha!
 
Walk By Faith
(click to view)

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

Another tough question! I find that my first response has to be to ask my Heavenly Father whether I am following His lead. More than anything, I want to be doing what He calls me to. So sometimes He will prompt someone to send me an encouraging note (or an invitation to be a featured DPW artist!), or maybe I will win an award or sell a painting. Sometimes I just begin to feel more confident by doing the next thing as a matter of discipline. And sometimes I just have to choose to paint as a discipline even if I don't feel better!

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?

I really don't have goals. I know that is not the way I am "supposed to" answer, but it is the truth. I would love to be able to paint when my Beloved Husband retires, and help support our family if possible, but I wouldn't call it a goal.

Dandelions
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally?  

I have asked myself this question before, and my best answer is that I want my art to communicate - to bring truth, goodness, and beauty into the world in a way that helps people see that God is True, Good, and Beautiful, and that He is extremely fond of us! It is a very tall order for paintings to do that, admittedly!
 
What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

There have been significant moments in my artistic journey, including awards, invitations to juried exhibitions and events, and good sales of my work, but at least today as I type this, I think one of the "proudest" moments for me was seeing the impact of one of my paintings on someone. Most years I host an open studio/open house in my home, and I invite as many people as I can get my hands on to come and see my new work! One particular year, I saw a lady in my studio gazing at an abstract work that was on my easel. It was a very meaningful work to me, but I was not yet sure that it was communicating like I wanted it to. But there she stood, weeping in front of that painting. She asked me about the meaning of it, and yes, she had indeed been impacted in the way that I had hoped. Not much can top that. 

DeFries Garden en Plein Air
(click to view)


Thanks, Brenda!

© 2022 Maddie Marine

Thursday, July 21, 2022

DPW Spotlight Interview: Mark Rosenbohm

 Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Mark's painting "Brown Pelican" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Mark's DPW Gallery Page: 

I am a self taught artist and native New Orleanian. I've spent my career as a graphic designer, illustrator and visual artist. As a college student, my first job was working as an artist in the t-shirt screenprinting industry. However, most of my career has been working a freelance artist, with a client list of small and large businesses. I work in a variety of mediums and styles, including watercolor, acrylic or oil.  I have produced posters and t-shirt designs for a number of local festivals and fairs. A lifetime of local music, food, art and architecture provide a rich inspiration for the work you see. 


Brown Pelican
(click to view)

What did you want to be growing up? 

I think my vision of what I’d be as an adult was much the same as most kids who are influenced by what appeals to them as they discover it. I think it was ever changing…a policeman whenever we had them visit our classroom as part of the ‘Officer Friendly’ program. Some days it might be a schoolteacher if I was particularly fascinated with my teacher that year. Art has always felt the most natural for me, so that has guided me to a career as a creative type. 

When did your artistic journey begin? 

Some of my earliest memories are drawing, the same as many kids. In my case, it has always been a part of my life. I was always the kid who was known as ‘good at drawing’. 

Streetcar sketch
(click to view)

Did you have any long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse? 

At various times, life gets in the way. I’ve felt very unproductive during those times. I usually seek inspiration by looking at the work of others. It always makes me want to start creating again. I have a large library of art books to browse, but social media makes that so much easier now. 

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal? 

I’ve worked in so many different mediums. Currently watercolor is my preference. It’s more portable, so I can draw while sitting in front of the television. Once I have a drawing, I can often sit down and complete a piece in one sitting. I’ve felt that way about acrylic painting at times, but it usually involves me dedicating time to work only in my studio. I haven’t had a real desire to paint only in oils, but I do use them with acrylics from time to time. 

Porch kitties
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice? 

I’ve been at this most of my life, so I think of style as a natural way of drawing, painting or mark making. It’s the sum of outside artistic influences colliding with methods and mediums that I find comfortable. My current line and wash work has been a really intuitive way of working. If it felt like a task to create, I would be frustrated and not bother. 

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why? 

There are so many. Lately, I’ve been looking at quite a lot of urban sketchers…Ian Fennelly, Paul Wang and an artist named Charlie Breen whose work is quite playful and enjoyable to me. I love illustrators like John Cuneo and Joe Ciardiello. These are only a fraction of people I follow. I really appreciate artists in a variety of mediums and approaches. I could go on all day. 

Lucky dogs
(click to view)

 If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be? 

Don’t get caught up in trying to create a style. Soak up the work of others you enjoy, but have fun making your own art. Enjoying the process will give you more joy than anything else. 

Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle? 

For me, it usually takes simply sitting down and drawing. Sometimes you create things you don’t like, but everyone has to get those bad drawings out before the better stuff comes along. Don’t beat yourself up over dissatisfying results. 

Tabasco
(click to view)

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward? 

Everyone has bad days. Sometimes, it just requires stepping away and coming back to it later. Involve yourself in something that’s totally unrelated to take your mind off of it. Exercise, put on your headphones and listen to music or a podcast, take a shower, take a walk, or read. I like to cook, so that usually takes me to a different place. 

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art? 

My immediate goal is to continue to explore watercolor, especially as it pertains to the urban sketch type of work that I’m currently creating. I’d also like to try exhibiting at some art markets after our sweltering summer has passed. Exploring other working methods in the near future is on my to-do list. It seems that working in a new or different medium, like watercolor, informs the way I work in others, so I’m anxious to explore different techniques in acrylic. It’s a bit vague for me right now, but I have a few ideas I’d like to try. 

Audubon Park Oak
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally? 

Enjoying the process is most important. Learning and evolving comes with that. If others like my work, that is a big plus. I suppose acceptance is good for most of us. If someone feels a connection to something I’ve created, that’s a really good moment for me. I’ve especially seen that in recent commissions and some other works. 

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life? 

I don’t think there is a single moment. There are so many happenings along the way. Sometimes I complete a piece and feel really proud of the individual work. There are other times when I receive a commission and worry that I won’t make my client happy, but I give my best and it works out. That makes me really proud of the work I’ve produced.

Near Rampart
(click to view)

Thanks, Mark!

© 2022 Maddie Marine

Thursday, July 7, 2022

DPW Spotlight Interview: Carol Betker

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Carol's painting "A Little Light" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Carol's DPW Gallery Page: 

Former art teacher in public schools, I now just enjoy painting alla prima everything in my path.....I have studied artists like Jessica Zemsky, Richard Schmit and Dreama Tolle Perry and love to play with light, edges and emotion.  Thank you for taking a look at my work and may it bring a smile to you!



A Little Light
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing interview

What did you want to be growing up? 

I remember this question back in high school as looking forward and saying "an art teacher"....maybe it was a lack of knowledge on my part of what careers were available for women, but after 5 years of stops and starts, I went back to college and finished my teaching degree, with an Art major. 
 
When did your artistic journey begin? 

We moved around a lot as a child following my father's work so maybe it was partly filling in the alone time (not lonely but just alone) that I always had my pad and pencil drawing over and over until I felt some sense of controlling those contours of whatever was in front of me, usually photos of horses. 
 
To The Banquet
(click to view)

Did you have any long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse? 

I don't think I had discipline for a long time to do daily practice of painting, I was teaching and one thing I remember not wanting to have my students influenced by my style (no surprise I had no style back then), I threw every kind of art medium my budget would allow for these kids to experience: drawing, painting, pottery, printmaking, etc....I was a one man band in small school districts! But when I retired about 10 years ago I started to take the time to explore what made me happy artistically. PLUS I have a husband whose wildlife photographs offer me endless inspiration and reference !!

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal? 

I enjoyed acrylic for several years because of the vibrant color, but now that oil has low odor, I prefer the blending ability of the creamy oils. Watercolor works for times when I'm sitting in the car and can't do messy kinds of painting. I lean toward impressionism trying to keep the painting loose, I appreciate abstracts but don't do them , and other expressions of art can be fun but I don't care for "dark" art that provokes... If I want to be depressed I'll turn on the news, right?

Berry Big
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice? 

I started like a lot of artists very tight, controlled, trying to make that thing look like what my mind was saying it should look like.....but I was using techniques with my students from "Drawing On The Right Side of the Brain" by Betty Edwards and "Drawing With Children" by Mona Brookes and I was relearning right along with the kids. I was aware of some rules of composition and now I was also breaking those rules, with boldness...at least it seemed bold for me!

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why? 

I studied the books by Richard Schmidt and loved how his edges just brought his beautiful oil landscapes to life! I took a workshop by Jessica Zemsky and learned that there are no excuses for not painting everyday, ...I fell in love with her portraits of children because I had young daughters at that time....and now my favorite artist is one of DPW's members, Dreama Tolle Perry. She has put the fun into my work and the encouragement to try any subject! I think I've taken every workshop she offers and it's the best investment I've made ! And I think Carol Marine is a master at lost and found edges!

Pretty Boy
(click to view)

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be? 

For me it's 'be authentic' ...learn what you can and then be your own voice. I'm still learning this by the way.
 
Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle? 

I keep my easel and paints set up, and a good supply of gessoed small boards. Small 8 x 8 or so can be finished fairly quickly with the alla prima style I prefer.
 
Peek a Boo
(click to view)

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward? 

Just start again, sometimes a little break to get inspired but it comes down to start again, get the brush moving, paints blending, and stay with it.

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art? 

I don't know if I have the energy anymore to do sidewalk sales and those types of shows. I seem to sell in galleries and venues that open up their wall space for art like we have a lot of wineries in eastern WA State who love the arts. I enjoy selling, and hope my work brings joy to the patron....that's satisfaction enough.

Promise
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally? 

If my work can make the viewer take a slightly longer look and feel some emotion in that moment then I'm getting close to success. 

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life? 

I have won some recognition awards in juried shows but I had an international validation moment a couple years ago when a viewer in Japan bought one of my large pieces from a local gallery .I am also grateful for DPW for opening up a platform for artists around the world! 

Awaiting
(click to view)

Thanks, Carol!

© 2022 Maddie Marine

Thursday, June 23, 2022

DPW Spotlight Interview: Sheila Marie

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Sheila Marie's painting "Joshua Tree" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Sheila Marie's DPW Gallery Page: 

I married young and we started our family a couple of years later. Creating fine art went to the back burner as I raised my kids and worked at multiple jobs that would allow me to be with my kids. Designing and fabricating stained glass for custom home builders, teaching stained glass, helping my husband build custom homes. When the kids were older I began working with a start-up company. There were three of us, the inventor/president, an accountant and myself. I started out helping with accounting and sales. As new challenges came up I volunteered to research and figure out the solutions. I ended up running operations and manufacturing. The first 14 years with this company, were incredibly exciting, fulfilling, boundless opportunities to grow, learn, create and be challenged every day. I'm still so thankful that the president of the company believed and had so much trust in me. An abrupt change almost 10 years ago changed my role dramatically. A role completely the opposite, sucking away the passion and joy that drove me. After several years of being very lost I found an old box of Grumbacher oils in my basement from 41 yrs. ago that I had played around with as a teen. I pulled those oils out, took a class at the Art League. I began to find my way. Slowly I began to dream again, to feel the excitement, fear, joy, challenge and strength of learning and growing again. Now almost 25 years later I have quit that job and will start again, another exciting journey. I work in oils painting plein air and in my studio. I love the outdoors and you'll see I lean towards landscapes. I do mix it up some with animals, still lifes and life drawing. Painting is all together exciting, challenging, frustrating, joyful, peaceful, leaving me exhausted and fulfilled. I'm continuously working on design, value relationships, soft and hard edges, and brush strokes. My goal, in the end, is to simplify, capture the mood, the essence and the emotion of that moment in time. Creating a work that will bring a beautiful statement to the home of its admirer.

Joshua Tree
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing interview

What did you want to be growing up? 

It wasn’t just one. I loved watching stage shows, musicals and variety shows as a kid. I thought it would be so much fun to be a dancer. 

When visiting the Natural History Museum and viewing the backdrops showing the natural surroundings of the animals I felt I could so easily walk in, feel the heat, the cold, hear the wind howling, birds singing and the insects chattering. How much fun that would be to go to those places to study, and come back to design and create those backdrops. 


And, of course doesn’t every little girl dream of being a fashion designer? Drawing lithe, graceful, beautiful women and men dressed in my creations.

 

When did your artistic journey begin? 

 

When I was in 5th grade I had a major crush on a boy in my class. He was really good at drawing and painting. The school would hang his pictures in the school hallways. I was extremely shy so I would never consider starting a conversation with him. But, maybe if I could be an artist he would like me and would ask me to go steady. Well, that didn’t work out but what I did discover is how much I enjoyed drawing.

 

Last Days of the Irises


Did you have any long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?


I’ve always been involved in creative endeavors. Thankfully no dry spells. 


Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal?


Oils and charcoal. I love the outdoors so landscapes are my main draw. I do also work on figures, still lifes, animals, just about anything as they bring much to my understanding of my practice.

 

I enjoy most genres. In the past, I just did not get abstracts. Over the past few years I have discovered a few abstract artist works that I enjoy. 


I do not care for works that are dark with a lot of angst and I definitely do not see a toilet bowl as a work of art, hah. 


Spreading Light
(click to view)


What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice? 


I’m still looking, lol. But really, I don’t even think about it. I kind of feel like it might stagnate me if I landed on a ‘style’.


Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why? 


Oh my gosh! There are at least a hundred and I’m sure hundreds more if I live long enough to discover them. A few off the top of my head, Len Chmiel, Walt Gonske, Nicolai Fechin, Jerry Jordan, Zoey Frank, Richard Schmid… I love their stories and their work which provides me hours of study. I never tire of looking at their work.


Tangerine Blues
(click to view)


If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be? 

 

Put away those photographs and paint and draw from life! It will expedite your learning and you will discover far more. After a few hundred paintings and drawings from life you'll begin to see what a photograph cannot. After another few hundred from life you'll be ready to pull out a photo every once in a while and refer to it to jog your memory. 


You will never reach the end of this journey and that is a wonderful thing. The more you learn, the more you learn what you still have to learn. This journey just gets more challenging, joyful and exciting.


Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle? 

 

Hah, I haven’t figured that one out yet!


Winter Park Spring
(click to view)


In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

 

I just do. If not forward, it’s either standing still (boring) and I won’t even consider going backwards.

 

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?


Both long and short I will simply continue to study and produce art. I will always be available to share, educate and mentor other artists.

 

Sipapu Cabins


What does success mean to you personally? 

 

Always pushing myself further and further. Completing works where I can see I reached higher and made it there. It builds my excitement to jump in right away and go even further. 


What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

 

It is a joyful moment when a collector loves one of your works for the good memories or feeling that it brings them.


Moab Early Evening Light
(click to view)

Thanks, Sheila!

© 2022 Maddie Marine

Thursday, May 26, 2022

DPW Spotlight Interview: Marlene Lee

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Marlene's painting "Orange with Grapes" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Marlene's DPW Gallery Page:

Since graduating from California State University, Sacramento in studio art in 2009, I began to pursue art seriously. I mainly paint in oils - landscapes and still life but my passion is portraits. I'm furthering my painting skills with workshops and classes from Terry Miura, a well known northern California painter, My drawing skills were strengthen through Jeff Watts Online Program and Sadie Valeri Online Atelier program.

Click here at my blog updated paintings and process and upcoming events. I do accept pet commissions either in oils or watercolor in my Etsy shop at PaintingsbyMarlene. (Shipping is free).

My other love is urbansketching. My sketches are posted on my Flickr page. Some of those sketches can be bought as prints at my Society6 store.

​Check out my book, Sketching Around Davis, on Blurb. It's a collection of my sketches done from 2013 through 2019 around Davis, California where I live.

Orange with Grapes 
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing interview

What did you want to be growing up? 

I wanted to be a children’s book illustrator because that is what I knew at the time that artists do to earn a paycheck. Later I realized that there were other jobs like technical illustrator or industrial designer. I took drafting in high school and loved it. 

When did your artistic journey begin? 

It's hard to say when my journey began. Maybe when I was six, I tore a section of wallpaper in my parents’ rented home to see what kind of shapes I could create. The beginning of my abstract exploration. 

But I do remember in school, enjoying the challenge of drawing, copying things exactly. In high school I took all the art classes and learned to use other mediums beside pens and pencils. Through books I taught myself perspective by drawing cases of sodas in the storeroom of my family’s grocery store. 

In college, even though I majored in accounting, I took all the art classes I could. And even sold some pieces like a portrait of a cougar in a ballpoint pen to my accounting professor. I did some commercial work for billboard signs and ads. 

After college, even though I had a business degree and did some accounting, I eventually got a job as a graphic artist.

Chloe
(click to view)

Did you have any long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse? 

When I got married and had my three sons, I had to invest all my creative and emotional energy into raising them. I did some art stuff with them like papermaking and marbling. We also did some rubber stamp carving. I kept my hand in the arts by taking calligraphy workshops in San Francisco and freelancing calligraphy jobs. I also took watercolor classes at the local art center for many years. 

As my sons grew older, I went to a nearby university, California State Sacramento, and got a second bachelor but this time in studio art. By the time my sons finished public schools and had entered into college, I had my degree and became serious about being an artist. That was back in 2009. 

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal? 

Drawing was my medium before the art degree. I love the pen and ink illustrations that I had seen in some Asian books that my parents kept. The use of thick and thin lines made by a brush fascinated me and still does. Currently it’s oils and watercolor. I love watercolor for its unpredictability; I feel I can be very expressive. Though I enjoyed working in oils, I still feel stiff; I’m seeking to be more expressive with my brushstrokes. I do love all the mediums….pastels, printmaking especially. I only have energy for just oils and watercolors. 

Pink Barn at Best Ranch
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice? 

An assignment in college was to cut out any images of paintings that we were drawn to. I’ve noticed it was paintings that had expressive brushstrokes. Impressionistic. I found that the more I paint the more my personal style just comes out. Like learning to do cursive writing. As kids we all learn from the same handwriting model but each kid would unconsciously put their own stamp into their writing. 

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why? 

John Singer Sargent for his expressive watercolors. Many of the contemporary artists depending on what my interests were at the time. Now it’s Bethann Moran-Handzlik for her on-site paintings of her garden. Her ability to paint the mundane, like a flower growing from a crack, is amazing. Other artists, landscape artists, are catching my eye for their minimal details and expressive brushstrokes. I tend to get too detailed and my aim is to paint the landscape impressionistically. Anne Blair Brown comes to mind. 

Trees in Midmorning at the Arboretum
(click to view)

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be? 

Don’t let the naysayers discourage you from pursuing your interest in art. Find ways to cultivate that interest. Whatever you pursue feeds into your creativity. 

It’s all about learning and not on just pure talent. 

Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle? 

Develop a routine. I run all errands, exercise…computer work all in the morning and paint in the afternoon. I want to totally focus on my painting completely. 

Also finding that working in a series of three to six paintings of similar subject matters, creates a momentum, getting into the flow. 

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward? 

Keep painting and drawing. 

Ginger Jar with Poppies
(click to view)

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art? 

Earlier when I started to paint in oils I would just paint still life, mainly fruits. My goal then was to get a handle on oil painting, getting to know the colors. I noticed that the colors of most fruits are similar to the colors of different skin tones.

Now I want to focus more on landscape paintings, especially plein aire. I want to experience different expressions with the brush, become more painterly…and avoid details that sometimes still life painting would demand. 

Last year I was accepted into an artist cooperative, The Artery, and it has pushed me to consider what to paint and to paint seriously and how to exhibit my works. My ultimate goal is to get into a gallery. 

What does success mean to you personally? 

Being an accomplished and recognized artist…being able to paint anything and everything. And to earn income from doing what I enjoyed best. 

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life? 

Being selected in a juried show, especially one juried by a well known artist was my pride and joy. Another moment was a learning moment. Just recently while painting a commissioned dog portrait, I’ve learned an important lesson in painting, I do not have to copy a photograph. I had lightened up a shadow area and it was an eureka moment. :-) 

Speaking of pet portraits, when my clients would say how they were moved in tears when they saw the portrait of their pet. This is actually my proudest moment. I am happy a client or buyer is touched by the painting. Then I had fulfilled my purpose in painting.

Gemini
(click to view)

Thanks, Marlene!

© 2022 Maddie Marine