Thursday, November 25, 2021

DPW Spotlight Interview: Jenny Johansen

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Jenny's painting "Daydreamer" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Jenny's DPW Gallery Page:

Finding the sound within silence

Jenny became an artist after spending time entranced in Utah's landscapes. She believes that every landscape has soul and soundtrack, and works to convey those rhythms and notes through her paintings.

Fascinated by classic paintings on copper and the natural luminance, it became her preferred painting surface. The combination of bold color and copper light give her paintings a sound that is best experienced in person.

You will find Jenny on remote roads, happily lost in the desert, or on a mountain peak; observing the always changing light and taking in every breath of that harmonic high.

What did you want to be growing up?

I grew up in a household with a father who played guitar in a band through the late 60’s and 70s. I always wanted to be creative and thought of being a songwriter/singer, or interior designer. The idea of landscape painting had never crossed my mind.

When did your artistic journey begin?

My creative side really started to manifest itself in high school. First with poetry and later with visual arts.

Daydreamer
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Jenny's interview.

Did you have long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?

I married after highschool and focused on family life. Even though I was not focused on oil painting, I was still very engaged artistically through restoring a Victorian home, photography and other creative pursuits throughout daily life. As my children grew up they became engaged in creative endeavors.

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal? 

I never saw myself as a landscape painter; yet the more time I spent outdoors the more I grew to appreciate unique moments that can only be found in the wild. After signing up for a plein air workshop on a whim with my mother-in-law, who is a plein air landscape artist, I was surprised at how differently I viewed the landscape. I began to experiment in oil, basic values and composition. After seeing a painting on copper, I became very intrigued in the look of oil on copper. Copper became my preferred surface almost immediately. Post impressionist art has always been my favorite and I think that shows in my work and the use of copper gives my paintings an ethereal atmosphere.

Afternoon Layers
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice?

Finding my artistic voice has been a long process, and at times frustrating. Pulling out oil paints and dedicating time to practice while raising 6 kids is not the most ideal way to find peace. I relied upon plein air festivals as incentive to motivate me to paint seriously at least a few times a year. Having always been drawn to vivid color, it felt natural when my preferences surfaced through paint choices. When I first started painting, I focused heavily on the use of a palette knife. It has been only the last few years that brush work has become my primary tool in painting. I’ve grown to love the effects of leaving bits of copper showing through on my paintings.

Name an artist (or artists), well known or not, you admire. Why?

You hear of Vincent Van Gogh a lot when artists reference influences, yet he is an inescapable influence on my love of landscape paintings. I love the movement in his paintings and the story of his struggles and being human. They speak to me, and I become rather emotional every time I get the opportunity to view his paintings in real life.

After the Storm
(click to view)

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self - what would that be?

Never underestimate the power of practice.

Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle?

A designated place for the creation of art is vital. Do not put your art supplies away, ever! It’s really hard to get them back out. Make a habit out of observing, seeing, and creating art.

Snapshot
(click to view)

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

I visited an art exhibit in an LA art gallery which was an old wash board with a dirty coat in water that had attracted lots of flies. I couldn’t really see the beauty in it, but it helped me to realize that everyone’s view of art is different. I also remind myself that people have enjoyed my paintings enough to buy them for themselves.

Even paintings that I think are failures, speak to people in important ways. The fact that people find meaning in my art, even if not what I see or intended, helps me find the motivation to share more.

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?

It’s taken 16 years to get to the crossroad that I’m at now. I have a little more time and have simple goals: paint more. I have been able to set up a more reliable practice and share what I am creating. In doing so I have found that a lot more people are paying attention. My long term goals are to continue to share those moments I can capture in paint.

90% Chance of Rain
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally?

It makes me happy knowing that people have found a connection in my work and have my art hanging in their homes. Knowing that something I made spoke to someone enough that they would put it in their personal space is enough.

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

There are many impactful moments for artists, but for me the opportunity to inspire my children to be creative, to see practice lead to art, is what makes all the mistakes and practice pay off.

Thanks, Jenny!

© 2021 Sophie Marine

Thursday, November 18, 2021

DPW Spotlight Interview: Steven Scheibe

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Steven's painting "Windy Winding Waldrick Road" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Steven's DPW Gallery Page: 

**Steven Scheibe's artworks physically embody things both seen and unseen.**

-   _Seen:_ Many of Steve's paintings simply celebrate the natural beauty and wonder of a thing, a place, or a moment_._

-   _Unseen:_ Other works by Steve gently amplify the voice of allegory he has discovered in nature's patterns. He says, "All that is visible is evidence of the invisible. Through art, I seek to make tangible the immeasurable realities of soul and spirit." 

Steve expresses his discoveries of the seen and unseen in a variety of media -including music, drawing, watercolor and oil painting, stone lithography, dye-painting silk, and art glass. He has created large, suspended murals in [dye-painted silk](http://www.visibleinvisible.com/pages/commission/hand-painted-silk.php) for public art. His sand-carved, mouth blown antique glass, and laminated [glass artworks](http://www.visibleinvisible.com/pages/commission/etched-glass-commissions.php) grace walls and windows of public spaces. His two-dimensional works are also included in many private, public, and museum collections. (click to read more)

What did you want to be growing up?

As a young child I wanted to be a research scientist in plants or animals or marine biology – and of course I wanted to be an artist.

When did your artistic journey begin?

When I was very young, my family’s television broke. My parents decided to intentionally not replace it. And so without that typical, on-demand entertainment available, my siblings and I invested all our spare time in creating and doing. We invented games, wrote music and plays, hosted contests with neighbors, learned many crafts, raised animals, and enjoyed discovering the great outdoors in the nearby woods, horses, fields, and lake. All of this fueled my love of nature and nurtured creative thinking. My first successful visual art was drawing a black-capped chickadee. It looked real, and I was hooked on drawing.

Windy Winding Waldrick Road
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Steven's interview.

Did you have long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?

I’m a creative. So even when I’m not painting, I’m cooking, gardening, or remodeling—everything done as an artist. Except when coping with stress, loss, or pain, creativity doesn’t ever “turn off.” That said, there have been seasons where I had to spend more time generating income by non-art related work. I found a growing tension within me until I was back in visual art again.

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal?

I create in dye-painted silk, glass, drawing, stone lithography, watercolor, oils, and pastels. Each medium embodies well different subjects. 

Acrylics are my least favorite to paint in because they are less forgiving. I’ve tried re-wettable acrylics with some success. I have painted successfully in acrylics at university, but now I use acrylics mainly in underpaintings and for toning canvases. I admire those who make them work so well. 

Watercolor is the most difficult but also the most fluid/dynamic, so their challenge keeps me curious. Oils are the most forgiving and offer the deepest deeps and endless mixing possibilities. Pastels are quick, with immediate color choices and a variety of mark-making options. In this chapter, I’m really enjoying the transparency and opacity of oils, and the luminosity and immediacy of pastels. They’re my current favorites. Next year, who knows?

Maple Dapple Trail
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice?

You know how when you hear your own voice recorded and played back, it sounds different – maybe even unfamiliar? Similarly, it’s not easy for me to fully identify my own visual artistic voice. But I naturally gravitate toward representational art and realism. Within that, I suspect my artistic voice is always changing (our speaking/singing voices do change throughout life) because I’m forever learning and adding something new. The possibilities are limitless!

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why?

There are very few artists whose works I don’t appreciate. Each artist I encounter – in print or in person –offers me another dimension of inspiration and art wisdom (which is seemingly endless). I’m particularly grateful for the living artists online today who share their work and processes. I’ve learned so much by watching numerous others create and listening to their interviews. And for that reason, I’ve begun making and sharing simple videos of my own art making.

Offut Summer
(click to view)

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be?

Don’t wait to create. If you don’t make it, it won’t become.

Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle?

My version of procrastination usually stems from a fear that the result won’t turn out (fail). Separating my personal worth from the outcome of an artwork is essential. Even if a particular project flops, I’m still me. That’s a challenge when we pour our souls into our work, but differentiation is key.

The main challenge for me is starting. And so preparing helps. When possible, I prepare reference photos and sketches in advance of anticipated studio time. And I leave my easels and supplies always set up to make beginning a little easier. I try to keep supplies and tools clean and ready. Once I start, I get in the zone and I wonder why I didn’t start sooner.

Another tip is consistency – keep painting regularly. I find that when I pause for even a week, I begin to lose confidence, and I hesitate to start.

One more tip: Once when I was young, a wise artist woman advised me, “Steve, if you paint commissions, be sure to do your own studio work as well, to keep up your confidence.”

Remembering Summer
(click to view)

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

Self-doubt and adversity certainly do come. 

Sometimes I take a break. Removing the pressure often makes the work joyful again.

I also solicit input from other trusted artist friends when I feel stuck on a particular painting. Their fresh eyes often help me find solutions.

And I pray - pretty much all the time, stuck or not. I see creating as a physical and spiritual collaboration. 

Oh, and music often helps me focus and relax and create. Music is a great motivator.

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?

Short term – I want to paint more. I want more studio time and less admin.

Long term – I want to be a painter and a writer and a friend.

(And somewhere along the way, I have a glass innovation/invention I want to develop more and share with the world).

Cape D. Lighthouse (delight house)
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally?

Success is always moving toward my goal. Even if a project fails, if I’m moving toward my destiny, that is success. Money and recognition are sure helpful, but they’re not an accurate measure of artistic success.

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

The accomplishments of solo shows and musical presentations and receptions in our State Capitol, and also at the Washington Center for Performing Art were biggies. I’m also super pleased with my public art waterfall for Liberty Middle School in Spanaway, Washington. It’s over three hundred square feet of dye-painted silk in a suspended sculpture, illuminated by water-effect lighting. 

Ok, that’s more than one proudest moment… but…

And lately, my heart jumps every time I begin to see my small landscape painting emerging from 2-D paper to an illusion of depth. Each one is a wonder to me!

Cycling Duo
(click to view)

Thanks, Steven!

© 2021 Sophie Marine

Thursday, November 11, 2021

DPW Spotlight Interview: Evan Wilson

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Evan's painting "12am" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

What did you want to be growing up?

To be honest, I didn’t know what I wanted to be, but I did have an answer prepared for when people would ask me. I always said that I wanted to be a brain surgeon. I think I came up with that answer because it was the most complicated career path I could imagine and I wanted to impress people.

When did your artistic journey begin?

My artistic journey began when I was a child. I still have drawings from when I was seven years old, so at least as far back as that. Luckily, my parents saved all of my art from when I was that young and it’s fun to look back and see what I came up with at that age.

12am
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Evan's interview.



Did you have long periods without creative expression?

I’ve never really had a time in my life for more than a few months when I wasn’t creating something. Throughout my childhood, teenage years, and up until now, I’ve always done something creative. I’m not happy unless I’m creating something and that's always been the case.

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal?

I really gravitate towards oil paint more than anything. I also really enjoy looking at drawings and charcoal but my heart is always drawn to oil paint. The texture that oil paint can also create adds something very appealing that I don’t find with other mediums. I think that paintings of interiors and nocturne paintings really strike me the most. I’m not super interested in sculptures!

Storefront
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice?

It’s a fun process! My taste changes and evolves the more art I look at, and I love incorporating different elements I discover into my paintings. Having been painting for only a few years means that I am still pinpointing my personal style but I know what I like to paint (and how) and I know what I don’t like, and that’s important.

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why?

I really admire Richard Claremont at the moment. There is something very captivating about his style that draws you in and keeps you there. His style makes you think that what you are looking at is the spirit of the subject, not the form. Details are blurred, edges are fuzzy, and shapes are distorted. It all makes sense though and I never get tired of looking.

Passing Sun
(click to view)

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be?

Start painting now and don’t wait until you’re older.

Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle?

I am always looking at art whether it’s on Instagram or Pinterest, and I usually am finding art that inspires me. Looking at beautiful art usually keeps me on my feet. Going to art stores to browse painting supplies also helps since I always want to buy new material and start new paintings.

Midnight Oil 2
(click to view)

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

Usually going to the gym and/or waiting until the next day makes me feel better. Feelings are fleeting and just knowing things will feel different tomorrow and in a week from now helps.

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?

I don’t have any long term goals. My short term goal is to create art that I love and that people love. As long as I’m doing that, I’m good.

Drugs
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally?

Success to me means doing what I want. If I have the freedom to do what I want then I am succeeding. Success is not a goal, it’s a process.

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

One of my proudest moments is when I sold my first painting. That feeling doesn’t come twice, but each sale is definitely a proud moment.

Cold Beer
(click to view)

Thanks, Evan!

© 2021 Sophie Marine

Thursday, November 4, 2021

DPW Spotlight Interview: John Wallie

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win John's painting "Sliced Tomatoes and Vegetables" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From John'a DPW Gallery Page:

I’m an acrylic artist based in Ohio. I’ve been painting since 2013.

What did you want to be growing up? 

Many things. I wanted to be a magician, a ventriloquist, a professional chess player, to name a few. Primarily though, I ended up wanting to be a professional game designer. I released many free games online through my teen years. I would make the graphics for the games myself, so in addition to being a hobbyist game designer, I was also what you might call a "digital painter."

When did your artistic journey begin?

Early childhood. I've been using pens and pencils to draw things on paper for about as long as I can remember.

Sliced Tomatoes and Vegetables
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing John's interview.

Did you have long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?

I don't think I've ever had long periods without creative expression. I always find something to keep myself from being bored. There was one time I had no canvases or painting panels left so I came up with the idea to use paper mache to "sculpt" a tortoise and then I painted that.

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal?

My favorite medium is acrylic paint. With acrylics I can mix any color I want and the cleanup process is easy. I also like to use alcohol markers, pens & pencils for sketches. 

My favorite genre in painting is impressionism. An impressionist painting for me is about escapism. Impressionist paintings act as windows that you can look through to see a world that is similar to the one you live in but different enough to be a fascinating new experience for your eyes. This is why hyper-realism, while it is a very skillful and respectable genre, does not appeal to me as much as impressionism.

I've experimented in abstract painting as well and never got too far. For me it seemed important to strike a balance between reality and abstraction, and impressionism is the best balance I've found.

Edge of Woods at Evening
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice?

To find my personal style I try to experiment by painting a variety of different subjects and simultaneously using new tools & techniques. Sometimes I see interesting effects in paintings by other artists and I'll try to reproduce those same effects in my own work. One question I always try to ask myself before I start a painting is, "Does this subject bore you?" and if the answer is "Yes," then I know not to waste my time painting it. You should only paint something if it looks interesting to you.

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why?

There are many artists who inspire me. Paul Cezanne, Claude Monet, Theodore Clement Steele. It's exciting to see how some of these first impressionists could simplify what they were observing in nature in order to put it onto canvas in the form of paint.

Scissors and Yarn
(click to view)

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be?

Don't paint objects. Paint the shadows and the effects of light.

Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle?

At the end of every day I write a "to do" list of things I want to accomplish for the next day. I place this list in a prominent place where I will see it frequently.

Macaw II
(click to view)

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

When facing obstacles I remind myself to "Do your best, and let God do the rest." (Quote taken from Mr. T) 

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?

I've only ever done plein air painting in Ohio, which is the state I live in. Eventually I'd like to go to some of the other states and create a bunch of plein air paintings while going around the country. My short term goals are usually just do a painting every day, or at least every other day.

Lemons and Metal Pots
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally?

There are two important successes I strive for. Number one is to create a painting that I'm happy with. Number two is to earn a living through my artwork.

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

I have no singular proud moment. Many of my paintings turn out to be failures, so when I complete one that I'm happy with, you might call it a proud moment.

Thanks, John!

© 2021 Sophie Marine

Thursday, October 28, 2021

DPW Spotlight Interview: Sachi Yoshimoto

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Sachi's painting "Two Apples" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Sachi's DPW Gallery Page:

Sachi Yoshimoto is a Tokyo based self-taught artist who works mainly in oil medium. She loves the warmth that the medium gives to her work. 

Artistically inclined from a young age, Sachi has worked diligently to bring her art to life. In 2013, after years of amateur work, Sachi decided to pursue her art wholeheartedly. 

Sachi’s style of work is “true-to-life,” focusing on the breath she finds in organic and inorganic objects. Her vision is to bring life into the objects she’s attracted to in everyday life. 

Apart from regular art commissions, Sachi often donates certain pieces and commission profits to animal charities she loves.

Like her art, Sachi continues to evolve and improve. Her ultimate aim is to have her artistic journey make everyone's life a little brighter. (click to read more)

What did you want to be growing up?

I’ve always loved drawing, but I really had no clue what I wanted to be…

When did your artistic journey begin?

It began when I was 5 years old. I used to go to a kid's art class at my best friend’s house where her mother was teaching. Since I was a quiet child, I really loved the peaceful atmosphere. Thanks to my mom who kept my paintings for decades! If you’re interested, you can see them on my website, in ‘about’ category.

Two Apples
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Sachi's interview.

Did you have long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?

Yes. My creative urge faded away after graduating from college since life got busy with full time office work.

One day in my early 40’s, I saw a pastel artist on TV and I felt like taking the class in order to get some fresh air. After joining the class, my passion for art slowly came back.

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal?

I gravitate toward oils. The richness of the colors, how it looks, and how I can manage the texture, I love everything about oil paintings. Currently I enjoy painting still life and seascapes/landscapes. 

In the Sunlight
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice?

I had no clue about my style or voice for years until I built quite a good amount of work, so just paint, paint and paint. Repetition is the key.

Technically, I paint most of my paintings with Alla Prima (wet on wet) to keep the fresh and spontaneous look. I find a painting knife very useful to express lights and energetic movements in nature. 

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why?

I truly admire Issac Levitan (1860-1900) who was a classical Russian landscape painter. It’s hard to explain why I’m drawn to his paintings, I just need to get some tissues before looking at his masterpieces.

Beyond Space and Time
(click to view)

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be?

Do what you love, don’t compare yourself to others, if you need any advice, ask someone who’s already accomplished your goal, just keep going and have fun!

Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle?

Just get started. The rest will take care of itself. Setting a panel and planning what to paint for the next day helps.

Cheery Cherries
(click to view)

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

Play some good music and dance! Change the energy as quickly as possible. I can have a pity party once in a while, but don’t stay there so long. Just set a small (for me 5x7”) panel on my easel, and paint anyway. 

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?

For both short and long term goals, I’d like to challenge new things, take lessons, and enter art shows in order to improve and evolve.

Reaching a bigger audience is another one, so that my future fans could find my paintings.

In addition to the above, if I could have my own art studio, it will be super fantastic!

Neutral
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally?

Besides seeing red dots on my paintings :), if I could capture the beauty of nature on canvas and brighten up your day with my art, I would call it a success.

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

This past summer, when I saw a lot of my paintings all at once on the floor, I was proud of myself and how far I’ve come. I’m so grateful for my gift and the circumstance that I get to do what I truly love.

And the moment when I got this DPW spotlight news. Thank you so much for your support and this wonderful opportunity DPW!

Together in Peace
(click to view)

Thanks, Sachi!

© 2021 Sophie Marine

Thursday, October 21, 2021

DPW Spotlight Interview: Jamie Wick

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Jamie's painting "Sunset Study #9" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Jamie's DPW Gallery Page:

Since I was little I have always loved to observe things and imagine how I would recreate the light, color, texture and movement. But I never actually attempted to until High School. I wasn’t very good at it, but loved learning all of the different mediums and techniques. I quickly grew a passion for it and for better understanding what I was capable of. (click to read more)

What did you want to be growing up?

I wanted to be a fashion designer or work in advertising. Instead, I now do accounting full time with art as my hobby. I look forward to retiring when I can focus on art full time.

Sunset Study #9
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Jamie's interview.

When did your artistic journey begin?

I have always loved creating, but don’t know that I was good at it. When I was in High School, I had an art teacher that I had adored. She made me feel that I had potential and I really wanted to please her so I worked harder. I made sure that I was in her class all four years. 

Did you have long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?

I would say all through my twenties I had lost touched with my passion and didn’t feel I was good enough to continue with it. I remember my husband at the time really loved ducks and was an ambassador for a duck foundation. I had drawn him a picture of a duck which in turn, he had donated to an auction for that foundation. At the time, I was upset that he donated his gift, but then I had seen people start bidding on the drawing and the dollar amount it ended up generating made me feel a sense of accomplishment and that I was possibly good enough. I have been pushing myself and challenging myself ever since.

The Reliance
(click to view)

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal?

I use acrylics from time to time, but I have always loved charcoals and pastels. The idea and feel of moving pigment with my hands on the paper. I have tried watercolors a few times, but I don’t find I get the deep contrast in values that I love and the medium seems a lot less forgiving so I tend to stay away from it. I love pushing the colors found in landscapes that typically go unseen and there is something so fun about birds that I love to paint them as well. 

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice?

A lot of trial and error and something I still feel I am continuously working at.

Untitled
(click to view)

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why?

Teresa Saia is one of my most favorite pastelists because of the risks she takes with her bold colors and lighting. I was fortunate enough to take a workshop from her a few years ago and will always value what I had taken away from it.

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be?

Don’t let the fear of failure stop you. Learn from your mistakes and move on.

Snow Geese on Sunday
(click to view)

Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle?

This is definitely not something I am good at and am easily distracted. I do find myself more creative on rainy days where I can light some candles and make myself cozy.

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

I will typically set it aside and work on something else. I feel that if I look at it long enough I can see what it is that is bothering me about it and I can make the changes I need.

Motionless Glow
(click to view)

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?

I have been really trying to show my art more in shows and galleries. My long term goal is to teach art in small class settings.

What does success mean to you personally?

I personally value a sense of accomplishment whether that's finishing up a piece that has taken me a while or that I have struggled with or by being accepted into a juried show that I was really hoping to participate in.

A Light in the Dark
(click to view)

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

I would say recently I had participated in a two-day art festival. I went the extra mile this time in making my booth and display look creative and professional. I was very proud of the outcome and had nearly sold out on the first day of the show.

Thanks, Jamie!

© 2021 Sophie Marine

Thursday, October 14, 2021

DPW Spotlight Interview: Rina Lubov

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Rina's painting "Just Wondering" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Rina's DPW Gallery Page:

Rina Lubov lives in California with her husband, beautiful two kids, dog and bunny. Originally from Russia, educated in LA, NY and Florence, Italy.

Over 25 years of painting and I am still learning to paint, unfolding complexity of playing with the paint and having fun.

Artist for life.

What did you want to be growing up?

I loved school and I wanted to be an elementary teacher.

When did your artistic journey begin?

I started to draw a little at school, but really my journey began when I was 16 years old. My father told me that we would be immigrating to America and I should learn some skills that might help me there. Since he was connected to some artists, I begun taking private classes for drawing and painting the year before we left.

Just Wondering
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Rina's interview.

Did you have long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?

No, I really didn’t have any periods without painting. If I don’t paint for a couple days, my mood shifts and I become unpleasant. Painting is my Prozac.

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice?

Every time I paint I am concerned about learning to paint, which to me means, "how can I do this better, more poetic, what new thing can I discover." I am not concerned with finding my voice or style, for me it will be a cage, a limitation, stagnation, kind of, "this how I sound, this is how I look, this is me." No I don’t want that, I have split personality disorder when it comes to my painting - one day I paint happy flowers, another day I paint cloudy sky, I just make sure I do the best painting I know how at this day.

Perrot, The Hairstylist
(click to view)

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why?

It’s a long list, but David Leffel will be #1. He has taught me so much and I am forever in his debt.

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be?

Get as strong of a foundation as possible and build any sandcastles that you want on top.

My Name is Sunshine
(click to view)

Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle?

I really don’t have those. Painting feeds my soul, cleaning, laundry or anything else doesn’t. My choice is always an easy one.

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

Critical doubt is constructive, self-doubt is not. I always tell myself that painting is challenging and it’s a problem-solving experience, so if I can identify the problem I can search for the solution (try different variations, look at other artists and how they solved similar problems or just erase and start over.) I always  say to myself, "I can do it!"

Sofia's Garden
(click to view)

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?

I have no goals, I just want to paint, be inspired, learn more, take classes, the rest will follow by itself.

What does success mean to you personally?

Success means freedom, I can do more of what I love.

Natalie
(click to view)

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

When I first erased my painting, I realized that we have complete freedom over our creations. Having a great show is also a burst to my ego, but the next show could be not a success and it’s the same paintings (so I feel not so proud about the same paintings.) I really think an artist is vulnerable to so many exterior conditions that we become insecure in our creations. I suffer from it too, except deep inside I know it doesn’t matter.

Guardian II
(click to view)

Thanks, Rina!

© 2021 Sophie Marine

Thursday, October 7, 2021

DPW Spotlight Interview: Elen Vejaya

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Elen's painting "Bird Portrait" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

What did you want to be growing up?

Really I was an active and noisy child. I learned to read and write early and easily found something to do. But I had no clear idea of adulthood. I definitely enjoyed creating something, and painting was part of that process.

When did your artistic journey begin?

Although I have been drawing since childhood, I consider February 2015, that is, 6 years ago, to be the start of my art career. Then I came to drawing consciously and with maximum determination.

Bird Portrait
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Elen's interview.

Did you have long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?

Yes, I did. This period lasted about 10 years and was after graduating from a school of art. By the end of the education, I had the skills, but there were absolutely no ideas and topics that I would like to express in my work. Then it seemed to me that it was closer to me to design buildings. I entered the architecture department at the university. Drawing was also part of the curriculum, but I didn't want to draw so much that I skipped classes. I left my studies. Over time, I understood myself and realized that everything that I want to translate into reality, I can first create on paper. I quickly realized that missing 10 years was bad for my level. And I decided on the challenge "1 day - 1 page", and lasted 2.5 years. This helped to gain confidence in drawing. 

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal?

Now I use paint markers, black gouache and acrylic paints. Step by step, I go to combine painting and drawings, different materials in my works, and add new methods. I want to complicate my work, to make them with a lot of composite.

I don't think I want to paint with watercolors or oil paints right now. I also like to look at realistic paintings, but I do not know how to create it. I prefer surrealism and some absurdity in my works.

Eel Fish
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice?

Once I finished a small drawing, I felt complete unity with the image and the medium. After a while, the same thing happened, but with a different theme and different medium. Now I have formed an idea of how my works and my style should look in the future. And I'm just moving in this direction. I explore new topics, master mediums, combine techniques. My current style is only one stage of development.

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why?

From classical art, Mikhail Vrubel inspires me. The characters in his work and the complex color combinations made a huge impression on me.

However, now I follow digital artists more. They create whole incredible worlds, three-dimensional models, locations. They are not limited to one plane or format of the painting. This is great freedom.

Headlights
(click to view)

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be?

Perhaps I have no advice. Each step taken, each obstacle overcome has led to the present creative self, and will lead to the future creative self.

Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle?

There is one trick. I have a huge stock of ideas and everything that is not created and not painted. What is already planned will be enough for me for three to five years of full time work. And every new book I read, every movie I watch, gives me more ideas and images. If I feel tired of one idea, then I simply choose another from the list or change the medium.

Puffer Fish
(click to view)

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

It is difficult to answer. Each new step and each new drawing gives me determination and self-confidence. Looking back, I know what path I have come across. And I can pass it again. So I just push forward.

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?

Right now, my short-term goal is to make money from my creativity so that I can do it all the time. Now I additionally work in the store.

As for the long-term goal, when I come to my final style in traditional mediums, I want to design a digital environment filled with art. An environment in which architecture, painting and sculpture will be woven together. It seems that I am only at the very beginning of this journey.

Tea Service
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally?

I think about a lot of my artwork around the world. Different sizes, different contents, different mediums. This will be my success as an artist.

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

Last year I created the cover for the first issue of a new literary magazine "СКОБЫ". That project suited me.

Shoal of Fish
(click to view)

Thanks, Elen!

© 2021 Sophie Marine