Thursday, October 14, 2021

DPW Spotlight Interview: Rina Lubov

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Rina's painting "Just Wondering" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Rina's DPW Gallery Page:

Rina Lubov lives in California with her husband, beautiful two kids, dog and bunny. Originally from Russia, educated in LA, NY and Florence, Italy.

Over 25 years of painting and I am still learning to paint, unfolding complexity of playing with the paint and having fun.

Artist for life.

What did you want to be growing up?

I loved school and I wanted to be an elementary teacher.

When did your artistic journey begin?

I started to draw a little at school, but really my journey began when I was 16 years old. My father told me that we would be immigrating to America and I should learn some skills that might help me there. Since he was connected to some artists, I begun taking private classes for drawing and painting the year before we left.

Just Wondering
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Rina's interview.

Did you have long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?

No, I really didn’t have any periods without painting. If I don’t paint for a couple days, my mood shifts and I become unpleasant. Painting is my Prozac.

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice?

Every time I paint I am concerned about learning to paint, which to me means, "how can I do this better, more poetic, what new thing can I discover." I am not concerned with finding my voice or style, for me it will be a cage, a limitation, stagnation, kind of, "this how I sound, this is how I look, this is me." No I don’t want that, I have split personality disorder when it comes to my painting - one day I paint happy flowers, another day I paint cloudy sky, I just make sure I do the best painting I know how at this day.

Perrot, The Hairstylist
(click to view)

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why?

It’s a long list, but David Leffel will be #1. He has taught me so much and I am forever in his debt.

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be?

Get as strong of a foundation as possible and build any sandcastles that you want on top.

My Name is Sunshine
(click to view)

Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle?

I really don’t have those. Painting feeds my soul, cleaning, laundry or anything else doesn’t. My choice is always an easy one.

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

Critical doubt is constructive, self-doubt is not. I always tell myself that painting is challenging and it’s a problem-solving experience, so if I can identify the problem I can search for the solution (try different variations, look at other artists and how they solved similar problems or just erase and start over.) I always  say to myself, "I can do it!"

Sofia's Garden
(click to view)

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?

I have no goals, I just want to paint, be inspired, learn more, take classes, the rest will follow by itself.

What does success mean to you personally?

Success means freedom, I can do more of what I love.

Natalie
(click to view)

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

When I first erased my painting, I realized that we have complete freedom over our creations. Having a great show is also a burst to my ego, but the next show could be not a success and it’s the same paintings (so I feel not so proud about the same paintings.) I really think an artist is vulnerable to so many exterior conditions that we become insecure in our creations. I suffer from it too, except deep inside I know it doesn’t matter.

Guardian II
(click to view)

Thanks, Rina!

© 2021 Sophie Marine

Thursday, October 7, 2021

DPW Spotlight Interview: Elen Vejaya

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Elen's painting "Bird Portrait" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

What did you want to be growing up?

Really I was an active and noisy child. I learned to read and write early and easily found something to do. But I had no clear idea of adulthood. I definitely enjoyed creating something, and painting was part of that process.

When did your artistic journey begin?

Although I have been drawing since childhood, I consider February 2015, that is, 6 years ago, to be the start of my art career. Then I came to drawing consciously and with maximum determination.

Bird Portrait
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Elen's interview.

Did you have long periods without creative expression? How did you get back on the horse?

Yes, I did. This period lasted about 10 years and was after graduating from a school of art. By the end of the education, I had the skills, but there were absolutely no ideas and topics that I would like to express in my work. Then it seemed to me that it was closer to me to design buildings. I entered the architecture department at the university. Drawing was also part of the curriculum, but I didn't want to draw so much that I skipped classes. I left my studies. Over time, I understood myself and realized that everything that I want to translate into reality, I can first create on paper. I quickly realized that missing 10 years was bad for my level. And I decided on the challenge "1 day - 1 page", and lasted 2.5 years. This helped to gain confidence in drawing. 

Which mediums and genres do you gravitate toward? Which ones don’t appeal?

Now I use paint markers, black gouache and acrylic paints. Step by step, I go to combine painting and drawings, different materials in my works, and add new methods. I want to complicate my work, to make them with a lot of composite.

I don't think I want to paint with watercolors or oil paints right now. I also like to look at realistic paintings, but I do not know how to create it. I prefer surrealism and some absurdity in my works.

Eel Fish
(click to view)

What was the process like of pinpointing your personal style or finding your voice?

Once I finished a small drawing, I felt complete unity with the image and the medium. After a while, the same thing happened, but with a different theme and different medium. Now I have formed an idea of how my works and my style should look in the future. And I'm just moving in this direction. I explore new topics, master mediums, combine techniques. My current style is only one stage of development.

Name an artist (or artists), well-known or not, who you admire. Why?

From classical art, Mikhail Vrubel inspires me. The characters in his work and the complex color combinations made a huge impression on me.

However, now I follow digital artists more. They create whole incredible worlds, three-dimensional models, locations. They are not limited to one plane or format of the painting. This is great freedom.

Headlights
(click to view)

If you could offer one piece of advice to your younger, creative self — what would that be?

Perhaps I have no advice. Each step taken, each obstacle overcome has led to the present creative self, and will lead to the future creative self.

Do you utilize any habits or tricks for winning the distraction and procrastination battle?

There is one trick. I have a huge stock of ideas and everything that is not created and not painted. What is already planned will be enough for me for three to five years of full time work. And every new book I read, every movie I watch, gives me more ideas and images. If I feel tired of one idea, then I simply choose another from the list or change the medium.

Puffer Fish
(click to view)

In moments of self-doubt or adversity, how do you push forward?

It is difficult to answer. Each new step and each new drawing gives me determination and self-confidence. Looking back, I know what path I have come across. And I can pass it again. So I just push forward.

What are some of your long and short term goals for yourself or your art?

Right now, my short-term goal is to make money from my creativity so that I can do it all the time. Now I additionally work in the store.

As for the long-term goal, when I come to my final style in traditional mediums, I want to design a digital environment filled with art. An environment in which architecture, painting and sculpture will be woven together. It seems that I am only at the very beginning of this journey.

Tea Service
(click to view)

What does success mean to you personally?

I think about a lot of my artwork around the world. Different sizes, different contents, different mediums. This will be my success as an artist.

What is one of your proudest moments in your creative life?

Last year I created the cover for the first issue of a new literary magazine "СКОБЫ". That project suited me.

Shoal of Fish
(click to view)

Thanks, Elen!

© 2021 Sophie Marine