Thursday, November 16, 2017

DPW Spotlight Interview: Jinnie May

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Jinnie's painting, "Clock Tower Capri III" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Jinnie's DPW Gallery:

My paintings include watercolor, acrylic, and mixed medium and oil. I paint large representational cityscapes and seascapes just about everyday in watercolor in a style I call Casual Realism. My abstracts are sometimes figurative but mainly non-objective on either paper or canvas. Whatever I paint I truly enjoy the process and hope you enjoy the outcome.

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

My mother was an artist who taught a kindergarten class at home and I used to draw alongside her students. We drew cartoon characters like Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, holiday items and various other things. Being an artist, my mom used to give my sister and me crayons and the back side of old wallpaper rolls to draw on to keep us busy. And it did! Crayons were always my favorite Christmas present. Both parents promoted creativity, risk taking and dreams. I was very fortunate.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

After high school all painting stopped, I went to college and earned a Master’s degree, entered the work force in a non-art related field. After thirty-five years, I retired. As a retirement gift to myself I took a watercolor class in Bermuda with Bryan Atyeo, a wonderful Canadian artist. At the time I didn’t know anything about watercolor, Bermuda or Bryan but had a great time, learned a lot and was hooked on watercolor.

Clock Tower Capri III
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Jinnie's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I started with watercolor and was enthralled with the California Watercolor Artists of the thirties and forties. I not only loved the style but also the genre they painted. I bought every book I could find on them and read them from cover to cover, over and over again. I stayed with watercolor as my primary medium until one snowy winter when I had exhausted my photographic subject matter and decided to try abstracts and acrylic.

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

Actually they all have “stuck”. I go back and forth with all three, using different subject matter with each medium.

Soon To Be Cherries
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I’m looking forward to doing large format oils, collage, encaustics and more acrylic... I’m open to trying all mediums and probably a few I don’t know of yet.

Who or what inspires you most?

Most of my inspiration comes from inside, my thoughts, my childhood and my experiences. When I’m stuck I look at art books, Pinterest, and YouTube. Always works for me. There are too many other artists to list who inspire me. Thanks to all!


A Stroll in Provincetown, MA
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

I’m fortunate to be able and willing to paint every day. I procrastinate in other areas but not when it comes to art.


What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Being single, having supportive friends, free time, adequate funds, health, space and desire, sounds simple but I worked at it!

Texas Prairie
(click to view)


How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

With my representational watercolor paintings, the scenes are mainly from European painting holidays both created on-site and from studio photos. With the acrylic abstracts, most don’t start with any planned ideas but rather come along as I paint (sometimes). That makes them a little more challenging and fun for me.


How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I try not to paint for anyone but myself. I say try because it is difficult to leave a style that sells, wins awards and is the people’s choice. It is an easy trap to fall into and difficult to stop. I enjoy pushing the envelope with art and am usually anxious to leave my “comfort zone”.


Seaside Sorrento
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I learn every day. I learn more about myself by painting than from the painting process itself. I’m reminded daily of my need to be challenged to be happy and get bored if things become complacent.

What makes you happiest about your art?

What makes me happiest in life in general is freedom and freedom also makes me happiest in art. I enjoy the freedom to paint what I want to paint, when I want to paint, how I want to paint, what materials to use, who I may paint with and where the painting may end up. Yes, several have been chucked in the fireplace, it’s a great feeling! I also enjoy the wonderful feedback from other artists, customers and the general public.

Thanks, Jinnie!

© 2017 Sophie Marine

Thursday, November 9, 2017

DPW Spotlight Interview: Tod Steele

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Tod's painting, "Feather Locklear" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Tod's DPW Gallery:

For lack of a better term, I call my painting style, 'Moomoo-ism', which is basically 'the joyous portrayal of cows and other creatures'. I am an animal painter because they make me so happy! While painting I work with lots of energy and joy... and my sincere hope is that the viewer will share in this merriment. My personal philosophy in painting is: "make 'em laugh... or at least smile a bit"... if I can do that, then I'm happy.

As a young fellow I took courses in Animal Husbandry and was amazed at how much personality the animals had, and they have fascinated me ever since, thus it was natural to paint them once I ventured into an art career. I believe that animals can help make us more human by connecting us to the Divine, and I am honored to celebrate their wonder in some small way. I live in Gold Beach, Oregon, with my wife, professional artist J.M. Steele, our Corgi, Lily Bell, and our studio cat, Emily Rose.

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

My wife has been a full-time artist nearly her entire adult life.  I am her biggest fan and have supported her in any way I could, but I never had thought of painting for myself.  But then on my 49th birthday I got this overpowering urge to paint.  This urge came out of the blue.  Totally unexpected.  With my wife's expert help I dove into painting and have never looked back.  Instead of watching TV I would spend entire evenings looking at art online, paying attention to which paintings I was drawn to, trying to figure out why they appealed to me. Painting is far and away the most fun and interesting thing I've ever done, however, the first three years where extremely frustrating.  All I did was study and make terrible paintings - ha!  I remember once sailing a lousy painting across the back yard into the berry bushes, vowing I'd never paint again.  However, I was addicted to it and persevered until I found my own unique style and the subject matter I loved most... animals.

Feather Locklear
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Tod's interview.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

Well, I loved to draw as a little kid, but somewhere around 8 or 9 someone made fun of my stuff and I stopped cold turkey.  I started in again at 49 years old, so yeah, I had a 40 year 'pause' - ha!

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I started in oils, as that's what my wife has mastered.  I like oil paint, but it doesn't like me.  I am a terribly messy painter and I would get oil paint all over myself.  Not a good thing.  So I tried acrylic, and after a short while fell in love with it.  I think it works especially well with my style of painting.

Lab With a Pearl Earring
(click to view)

Which other mediums are you looking forward to exploring?

No, I think I'm sticking with acrylics.  Sometimes I try a painting in oil, but then run quickly back to acrylics.  Oil is a great medium, but I'm just more familiar and comfortable with acrylics.  Mediums don't really excite me as much as ideas do.  New, fun ideas... that's what I hope to explore.

Who or what inspires you most?

Far and away God is my inspiration.  I mean God as in His creation, in His animals, in quality music, etc.  I believe that 'being in the zone' is actually being connected to the Divine, whether we call it that or not.  That's why we humans love being in that zone so much.  If we're painting or writing or baking or building a business... whatever creative thing it is we love doing, 'being in the zone' just feels so darn good.  So right.

Vincent Should Have Had a Dog
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?

I don't have too much trouble with that really, but when those times come when I just don’t want to go to the studio, I often refer instead to the huge computer file where I have hundreds of my favorite paintings.  It quickly lights a fire in me to get back to work.

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Late at night or early in the morning work best for me.  Once the day starts there seems to be too many distractions.  Early or late is the best because of the quiet.

This Too Shall Pass
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

Oh wow.  All sorts of various ways.  Driving around and photographing farm animals.  Watching movies.  Looking at magazines.  Going to shows or festivals to observe people and animals.  Often when I'm painting, an idea will come for another painting.  I love puns and humor of all kinds, and a humorous phrase will often take over my imagination and then become a painting.  Thankfully, ideas for paintings aren't much of a problem (but as my wife says, I just have to make sure they are GOOD ideas - ha!)

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

I think it's very important to paint for myself - not for others.  I try to paint things that bring me joy.  In doing so I believe the work will find a resonance in others of like mind.  There's an old saying that goes, "No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader".  It's true.  So, as artists we have to make sure we're passionate about what we paint, or the viewer will not be impressed.  Thus I make sure I have lots of fun when I paint, hoping that the fun will come through to the viewer.

Frida Cowlo
(click to view)

What makes you happiest about your art?

I've done pet commissions for years... I just love doing them.  The positive feedback from clients really brings me joy.  One lady emailed that the painting I did of her old pup is her very most prized possession.  Now, that's a great feeling.  To know that my painting will be on their wall to remind them of their beloved pet is a great honor.

PS. I just started up a Facebook art page. If the reader would be so kind to like the page that would be great and most appreciated.  Thank you!

Thanks, Tod!

© 2017 Sophie Marine

Thursday, November 2, 2017

DPW Spotlight Interview: Judy Wilder Dalton

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Judy's painting, "Into the Woods" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.


From Judy's DPW Gallery:

Judy is a native East Texan, and now resides in the beautiful and peaceful setting of Holly Lake Ranch, Texas. Her work has been exhibited in many national and international exhibitions and solo exhibits Judy has won numerous awards for her paintings, and her work can be found in private and public collections throughout the United States. Judy teaches classes and workshops in creative design and composition. (read more)

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I began painting in my early twenties.  I joined a local art group that had monthly demos and juried art shows. I took as many classes and workshops as I could. Many of the friendships made with other artists have lasted through the years.  I am so happy to see that so many have become successful artists. I believe belonging to a group like that can provide good building blocks for the aspiring young artists.

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I did have a tough time painting after a divorce, but with the encouragement of other artists and close friends,  I worked past it and began painting again.

Into the Woods
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Judy's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with?

I began with watercolor and oil painting and stayed with them for many years.  Once I tried pastel,  I was hooked.  I put it aside during my time after divorcing and when I started back painting, it was with acrylic on watercolor paper in a very abstract application.  I have been back to pastel for a couple of years now and feel as if I have come home.  I find that what I learn new in one medium always translated in some manner in the other mediums.  I think that contributes to staying fresh and exciting.

Crop Lines
(click to view)

Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

One medium I tried for a while was clay sculpture.  I loved it, but made a decision that I loved color too much.

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

I am happy staying with oil and pastel.

Over the Hill
(click to view)

Who or what inspires you most?

Being in nature is probably the best inspiration I have. 

What does procrastination look like for you?

Getting bored will shut me down, but that is when I know it is time to get outside and explore.

Tree
(click to view)

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

Committing to painting daily paintings and posting to Daily Paintworks as been a great motivator for me. 

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

I take lots of photographs and travel with some dear friends that love photography.  The travel and the photography give me plenty of resource material to work from. 

Barns
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist? 

Teaching workshops and classes keeps me excited about art.  I enjoy learning from each students unique vision as well as sharing mine.  I have to be aware of why I make the choices and decisions I make with a painting,  if I am to explain it to my class.

What makes you happiest about your art?

When a painting starts to take on a life of its own and speaks to me.  I love to “listen” to my art.

Thanks, Judy!

© 2017 Sophie Marine