Thursday, March 5, 2020

DPW Spotlight Interview: Alona Morozova

Each week we will spotlight a different DPW artist who will give away one of their best paintings. To enter to win Alona's painting "Puppy" go to Daily Paintworks and click on the link at the top of the page announcing their interview.

From Alona's DPW Gallery Page:

I’m artist from Latvia.

I was really inspired by idea of making small format paintings on a daily basis.

Tell us a bit about how you first started painting.

I started painting and took it seriously quite recently, around a year ago. It had been more like splashes before that. Something emotional and inconsistent. One small book has turned unexpectedly my vision upside down… thank you, Carol Marine… :)

Did you have any stops and starts in your painting career?

I didn’t have any stops because I didn’t have any move. I’m at the beginning of my way.

Puppy
(click to view)

Enter to win by clicking on the link at the top of the DPW home page announcing Alona's interview.

What mediums and genres have you experimented with? Which ones have "stuck" and which ones have fallen away?

I have been in love with oils since the beginning.

It wasn’t easy to start with. That’s why I used to work with acrylics. But I always had a feeling that something is missing.

I like to experiment with a palette knife.

I am currently not interested in any other mediums. Who knows, I might study watercolours or pastels sometime. I sincerely admire the skilled painters who work with this.

Regarding the genres, I have started with animals, and it seems that's where I will get stuck. I adore them and love to paint them.

Bambi
(click to view)

Which ones are you looking forward to exploring?

Oh, I wish I could paint like Tibor Nagy… where reality and abstraction merge into unbelievable harmony. That is something what I would like to explore.

Who or what inspires you most? 

An opportunity to make paintings inspires me a lot. Also, when someone likes and needs my work. Private commissions of pets are very inspiring as well. There’s always something that grabs my attention when browsing photos of animals. There are always some details to put on canvas like face expression or funny action. Those ones that make me laugh or smile are my favourite.

Video workshops especially when I feel disappointed.

Set of new oils or palette knives can do a job. There is an instant passion to try it straight away.

Me and My Friend
(click to view)

What does procrastination look like for you?  

It's ironic that I hate when something or someone takes my time away from painting... but... as soon as I get it... I drink tea with a chocolate bar! And it's horrible!

What techniques work to ensure that you make time for your art?

A technique called "When no one's at home," and the second one is "I’ve got a commission."

Smile!
(click to view)

How do you generally arrive at ideas for your paintings?

Sometimes I get an idea when I browse huge number of photos. Sometimes a canvas size or shape gives me a hint. Also, when I work and realise that something goes completely wrong, I remove what I have done and straight after that I get a clue to what I should do.

How do you keep art "fresh?" What techniques have helped you avoid burnout and keep your work vibrant and engaging?

Probably the fact that I don’t deal with art full time and have a lot of family responsibilities saves me from burnout. Therefore, I’m hungry for painting most of the time.

Parrot Portrait
(click to view)

What do you feel you are learning about right now as an artist?

I feel like a person who has just learned the alphabet and is starting to write.

What makes you happiest about your art?

When I get a result and I want to kiss it or caress it. Or when I work and notice that I’m periodically smiling.

Thanks, Alona!

© 2020 Sophie Marine

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